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TITLE
Tain from the East
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_102_P000
PLACENAME
Tain
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Tain
DATE OF IMAGE
1886
PERIOD
1880s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30887
KEYWORDS
Tain
Royal Charters
burghs
saints
St Duthac
chapels
sanctuaries
tollbooths
buildings
Tain from the East

The Royal Burgh of Tain sits on the shores of the Dornoch Firth about 10 miles north-east of Invergordon. The town received its Royal Charter in 1066, making it the oldest Royal Burgh in Scotland.

Tain was the birthplace of St Duthac, and his relics were returned there after his death in Ireland. A chapel built in his name later became a place of pilgrimage and sanctuary. The wife, daughters and sisters of King Robert the Bruce took refuge there in 1307 but, ignoring the chapel's sanctuary, the Earl of Ross handed them over to the English.

An imposing sight in Tain is the Tollbooth, which was built as a prison and safe house for the Burgh's charters and arms. During the Highland clearances of the 19th century, it was used as an administration centre.

This illustration was taken from Rev W Taylor's 'Researches into the History of Tain'

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Tain from the East

ROSS: Tain

1880s

Tain; Royal Charters; burghs; saints; St Duthac; chapels; sanctuaries; tollbooths; buildings

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The Royal Burgh of Tain sits on the shores of the Dornoch Firth about 10 miles north-east of Invergordon. The town received its Royal Charter in 1066, making it the oldest Royal Burgh in Scotland.<br /> <br /> Tain was the birthplace of St Duthac, and his relics were returned there after his death in Ireland. A chapel built in his name later became a place of pilgrimage and sanctuary. The wife, daughters and sisters of King Robert the Bruce took refuge there in 1307 but, ignoring the chapel's sanctuary, the Earl of Ross handed them over to the English.<br /> <br /> An imposing sight in Tain is the Tollbooth, which was built as a prison and safe house for the Burgh's charters and arms. During the Highland clearances of the 19th century, it was used as an administration centre.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from Rev W Taylor's 'Researches into the History of Tain'