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TITLE
Sketch of Craig Patrick
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_103_P001
PLACENAME
Craig Phadrig
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1777
PERIOD
1770s
CREATOR
'Mr Watt, Engineer'
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30891
KEYWORDS
forts
strongholds
Craig Phadraig
Picts
hills
plans
zoomable

Craig Phadrig or Craig Phadraig, shown here as 'Craig Patrick' is a vitrified fort on a hilltop near Inverness. Vitrification occurs when a structure is burned so fiercely that the stones fuse together.

The fort dates from the 5th or 4th century BC but archaeological evidence shows that it was reoccupied during the time of the Picts in the 6th century AD. Craig Phadrig became a major Pictish stronghold and was reputed to have been the stronghold of the Pictish King Brude when he met St Columba and was converted to Christianity.

The fort is thought to have been destroyed by fire in the 8th century.

This plan was taken from 'An Account of some Remarkable Ancient Ruins, Lately discovered in the Highlands, and Northern Parts of Scotland', by John Williams (1777)

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Sketch of Craig Patrick

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1770s

forts; strongholds; Craig Phadraig; Picts; hills; plans; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (maps)

Craig Phadrig or Craig Phadraig, shown here as 'Craig Patrick' is a vitrified fort on a hilltop near Inverness. Vitrification occurs when a structure is burned so fiercely that the stones fuse together. <br /> <br /> The fort dates from the 5th or 4th century BC but archaeological evidence shows that it was reoccupied during the time of the Picts in the 6th century AD. Craig Phadrig became a major Pictish stronghold and was reputed to have been the stronghold of the Pictish King Brude when he met St Columba and was converted to Christianity. <br /> <br /> The fort is thought to have been destroyed by fire in the 8th century.<br /> <br /> This plan was taken from 'An Account of some Remarkable Ancient Ruins, Lately discovered in the Highlands, and Northern Parts of Scotland', by John Williams (1777)