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TITLE
Landing fish
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_130_P130
DATE OF IMAGE
1760
PERIOD
1720s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30907
KEYWORDS
fishing
fishermen
women
carrying
fish
markets
cargoes
loads
boats
shores
wading
Landing fish

This illustration is from 'Letters from a Gentleman in the North of Scotland to his friend in London' by Edmund Burt.

Burt was an Englishman sent to Scotland in 1730 to collect rents on the Glenmoriston and Seaforth estates, which were the last unsold estates forfeited after the 1715 rising. For most of the time he was based in Inverness, from where he wrote the letters.

Publishing them anonymously in 1754, Burt was accused of presenting the Highlands in a bad light, concentrating on the squalor and backwardness. Despite these accusations, his satirical and witty accounts are entertaining to read, and remain an important source of information on Highland life and customs in the 18th century, before a more romantic view took hold.

Observing the laziness of some fishermen, Burt describes how, when the boats have come in as far as they can, the women tuck up their clothes and wade out to collect the catch and bring it ashore. Once this is done, the women again wade out to the boats and carry the fishermen ashore on their backs.

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Landing fish

1720s

fishing; fishermen; women; carrying; fish; markets; cargoes; loads; boats; shores; wading

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This illustration is from 'Letters from a Gentleman in the North of Scotland to his friend in London' by Edmund Burt.<br /> <br /> Burt was an Englishman sent to Scotland in 1730 to collect rents on the Glenmoriston and Seaforth estates, which were the last unsold estates forfeited after the 1715 rising. For most of the time he was based in Inverness, from where he wrote the letters. <br /> <br /> Publishing them anonymously in 1754, Burt was accused of presenting the Highlands in a bad light, concentrating on the squalor and backwardness. Despite these accusations, his satirical and witty accounts are entertaining to read, and remain an important source of information on Highland life and customs in the 18th century, before a more romantic view took hold.<br /> <br /> Observing the laziness of some fishermen, Burt describes how, when the boats have come in as far as they can, the women tuck up their clothes and wade out to collect the catch and bring it ashore. Once this is done, the women again wade out to the boats and carry the fishermen ashore on their backs.