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TITLE
The Beauties of Scotland
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_135_P001
PLACENAME
Dun Dornadilla / Dun Dornaigil
DISTRICT
Eddrachillis and Durness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Durness
DATE OF IMAGE
1808
PERIOD
1800s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30908
KEYWORDS
brochs
walls
lintels
stones
The Beauties of Scotland

Dun Dornadilla, also known as Dun Dornaigil, is a ruined broch which stands above the Strathmore River in Sutherland approximately 10 miles south of Hope. Only the outer wall of the broch survives and is now supported by a modern buttress. Within the wall there is a staircase which would have originally led to an upper gallery. In general the walls stand between only 1.8 and 3.3m high but at the highest point the wall reaches 6.7m. One of the most notable points is the massive triangular lintel over the entrance to the broch.

This illustration is from of 'The Beauties of Scotland: Containing a clear and full account of the agriculture, commerce, mines and manufactures of the population, cities, towns, villages &c of each county. Vol. V', by Robert Forsyth (Edinburgh: Constable,1808). The engraving is found on a supplementary title-page with the imprint 'London: published by Vernor, Hood & Sharpe, May 1st 1808'

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The Beauties of Scotland

SUTHERLAND: Durness

1800s

brochs; walls; lintels; stones

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Dun Dornadilla, also known as Dun Dornaigil, is a ruined broch which stands above the Strathmore River in Sutherland approximately 10 miles south of Hope. Only the outer wall of the broch survives and is now supported by a modern buttress. Within the wall there is a staircase which would have originally led to an upper gallery. In general the walls stand between only 1.8 and 3.3m high but at the highest point the wall reaches 6.7m. One of the most notable points is the massive triangular lintel over the entrance to the broch.<br /> <br /> This illustration is from of 'The Beauties of Scotland: Containing a clear and full account of the agriculture, commerce, mines and manufactures of the population, cities, towns, villages &c of each county. Vol. V', by Robert Forsyth (Edinburgh: Constable,1808). The engraving is found on a supplementary title-page with the imprint 'London: published by Vernor, Hood & Sharpe, May 1st 1808'