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TITLE
Map showing army movements prior to Battle of Culloden, 1746
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_144_P153
PLACENAME
Culloden
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1899
PERIOD
1740s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30915
KEYWORDS
Jacobites
Jacobite Uprising
Jacobite Rebellion
Bonnie Prince Charlie
Battle of Culloden
Drumossie Moor
Duke of Cumberland
zoomable

The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle to be fought on British soil. It marked the end of the 1745 Jacobite Rising and of the Jacobite cause in general.

By April 1746, the Jacobite army was tired, hungry and demoralised after their long march north from Derby. As the army was pursued north by the Duke of Cumberland, many Highlanders began to desert. Despite advice from Lord George Murray to take to the hills and fight, Bonnie Prince Charlie chose Culloden Moor as the place to stand against the government army.

On the night of 15 April 1746, the Jacobite army marched from Culloden to Nairn in the hope of taking the Duke of Cumberland's army by surprise. However, when they reached Nairn just before dawn, they found the government army awake and celebrating the Duke's 25th birthday. The Jacobites turned round and marched the ten miles back to Culloden. Realising that the Jacobites had been marching all night, the Duke of Cumberland decided to face them at Culloden Moor. The battle was over in less than an hour.

Approximately 1500 Jacobites were killed during and after the battle, including innocent bystanders, women and children. This action earned the Duke of Cumberland the nickname 'Butcher'. Bonnie Prince Charlie fled the battlefield before the end of the fighting and eventually escaped back through France to Rome.

This map shows the army movements prior to the battle. It is from 'Historical Geography of the Clans of Scotland' by T B Johnston & Col James A Robertson, 3rd Edition, 1899

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Map showing army movements prior to Battle of Culloden, 1746

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1740s

Jacobites; Jacobite Uprising; Jacobite Rebellion; Bonnie Prince Charlie; Battle of Culloden; Drumossie Moor; Duke of Cumberland; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (maps)

The Battle of Culloden was the last pitched battle to be fought on British soil. It marked the end of the 1745 Jacobite Rising and of the Jacobite cause in general.<br /> <br /> By April 1746, the Jacobite army was tired, hungry and demoralised after their long march north from Derby. As the army was pursued north by the Duke of Cumberland, many Highlanders began to desert. Despite advice from Lord George Murray to take to the hills and fight, Bonnie Prince Charlie chose Culloden Moor as the place to stand against the government army. <br /> <br /> On the night of 15 April 1746, the Jacobite army marched from Culloden to Nairn in the hope of taking the Duke of Cumberland's army by surprise. However, when they reached Nairn just before dawn, they found the government army awake and celebrating the Duke's 25th birthday. The Jacobites turned round and marched the ten miles back to Culloden. Realising that the Jacobites had been marching all night, the Duke of Cumberland decided to face them at Culloden Moor. The battle was over in less than an hour. <br /> <br /> Approximately 1500 Jacobites were killed during and after the battle, including innocent bystanders, women and children. This action earned the Duke of Cumberland the nickname 'Butcher'. Bonnie Prince Charlie fled the battlefield before the end of the fighting and eventually escaped back through France to Rome.<br /> <br /> This map shows the army movements prior to the battle. It is from 'Historical Geography of the Clans of Scotland' by T B Johnston & Col James A Robertson, 3rd Edition, 1899