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TITLE
Old Scotch plough and Caschroim, or crooked spade
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_159_8
DATE OF IMAGE
1875
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30917
KEYWORDS
Scotch plough
caschroim
ploughs
agriculture
highlands
highland ploughs
Old Scotch plough and Caschroim, or crooked spade

The illustration of an old scotch plough and a caschroim, or crooked spade, was produced from a woodcut in the letterpress, in John S Keltie's 'A history of the Scottish Highlands, Highland clans and Highland regiments', 1875, p 9.

He describes the length of the Highland plough as 'about four feet and a half, and had only one stilt or handle, by which the ploughman directed it. A slight mould-board was fastened to it with two leather straps, and the sock and coulter were bound together at the point with a ring of iron. To this plough were yoked abreast four, six, and even more horses or cattle, or both mixed, in traces made of thongs of leather. To manage this unwieldy machine it required three or four men. The ploughman walked by the side of the plough, holding the stilt with one hand; the driver walked backwards in front of the horses or cattle, having the reigns fixed on a cross stick, which he appears to have held in his hands. Behind the ploughman came one and sometimes two men, whose business it was to lay down with a spade the turf that was torn off.'

The Caschroim, or crooked spade, was used in more rocky areas inaccessible to the plough. ' It consists of a strong piece of wood, about six feet long, bent near the lower end, and having a thick flat wooden head, shod at the extremity with a sharp piece of iron. A piece of wood projected about eight inches from the right side of the blade, and on this the foot was placed to force the instrument diagonally into the ground'

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Old Scotch plough and Caschroim, or crooked spade

1870s

Scotch plough; caschroim; ploughs; agriculture; highlands; highland ploughs

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The illustration of an old scotch plough and a caschroim, or crooked spade, was produced from a woodcut in the letterpress, in John S Keltie's 'A history of the Scottish Highlands, Highland clans and Highland regiments', 1875, p 9. <br /> <br /> He describes the length of the Highland plough as 'about four feet and a half, and had only one stilt or handle, by which the ploughman directed it. A slight mould-board was fastened to it with two leather straps, and the sock and coulter were bound together at the point with a ring of iron. To this plough were yoked abreast four, six, and even more horses or cattle, or both mixed, in traces made of thongs of leather. To manage this unwieldy machine it required three or four men. The ploughman walked by the side of the plough, holding the stilt with one hand; the driver walked backwards in front of the horses or cattle, having the reigns fixed on a cross stick, which he appears to have held in his hands. Behind the ploughman came one and sometimes two men, whose business it was to lay down with a spade the turf that was torn off.'<br /> <br /> The Caschroim, or crooked spade, was used in more rocky areas inaccessible to the plough. ' It consists of a strong piece of wood, about six feet long, bent near the lower end, and having a thick flat wooden head, shod at the extremity with a sharp piece of iron. A piece of wood projected about eight inches from the right side of the blade, and on this the foot was placed to force the instrument diagonally into the ground'