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TITLE
Tain - Voices From Their Past (11 of 13)
EXTERNAL ID
TDM_PAULLIPPOK_03
PLACENAME
Tain
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Tain
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Paul Lippok
SOURCE
Tain & District Museum
ASSET ID
3092
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2

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This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Tain and District Museum. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The gentleman being interviewed in this extract is Paul Lippok.

'Now, you may wonder what made me stay in Tain all that time, finally to be my home. The county of Silesia where I was born, in northern Germany, the eastern part, where at the Yalta Conference agreed by Stalin on his insistence would be annexed to Poland which meant the - probably the first real ethnic cleansing that the population, the German population, were had to be sent to Western Germany and resettled there. Now I did not live through that because Silesia was overrun by the Russians but we were able to follow it in the States by receiving the newspapers. That paid - it meant that I didn't know where my father or mother or family were alive or where they were. Eventually we discovered, while still a prisoner - I had a letter from my brother that he managed to escape to the western part, in northern Germany - and the good news was that all of our - my sister and my parents were alive. My parents were not allowed to leave at that time because my father was a key worker in the quarry, and my sister resettled in the southern Germany. My brother mentioned the situation in Germany after the war - the chaos and all that sort of thing. We were offered to - even before being demobbed which happened a year and a half afterward in 1947 - if the farmer had a place for a prisoner he could take the prisoner in, although he was still a prisoner, as long as you reported at the weekends at the camp you were still here. The family were extremely kind to me. In fact, Mrs. Munro became probably my foster mother. I lived in with the family and, as fate would have it, I can't really put my finger onto it, but it must be the surrounding, the people itself, of Tain, that made me decide, yes, I would stay and make it my home.'

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Tain - Voices From Their Past (11 of 13)

ROSS: Tain

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2;

Tain & District Museum

Voices From Their Past - Tain

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Tain and District Museum. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The gentleman being interviewed in this extract is Paul Lippok.<br /> <br /> 'Now, you may wonder what made me stay in Tain all that time, finally to be my home. The county of Silesia where I was born, in northern Germany, the eastern part, where at the Yalta Conference agreed by Stalin on his insistence would be annexed to Poland which meant the - probably the first real ethnic cleansing that the population, the German population, were had to be sent to Western Germany and resettled there. Now I did not live through that because Silesia was overrun by the Russians but we were able to follow it in the States by receiving the newspapers. That paid - it meant that I didn't know where my father or mother or family were alive or where they were. Eventually we discovered, while still a prisoner - I had a letter from my brother that he managed to escape to the western part, in northern Germany - and the good news was that all of our - my sister and my parents were alive. My parents were not allowed to leave at that time because my father was a key worker in the quarry, and my sister resettled in the southern Germany. My brother mentioned the situation in Germany after the war - the chaos and all that sort of thing. We were offered to - even before being demobbed which happened a year and a half afterward in 1947 - if the farmer had a place for a prisoner he could take the prisoner in, although he was still a prisoner, as long as you reported at the weekends at the camp you were still here. The family were extremely kind to me. In fact, Mrs. Munro became probably my foster mother. I lived in with the family and, as fate would have it, I can't really put my finger onto it, but it must be the surrounding, the people itself, of Tain, that made me decide, yes, I would stay and make it my home.'