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TITLE
First Earl of Breadalbane
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_159_394
DATE OF IMAGE
1874
PERIOD
1680s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30951
KEYWORDS
Campbells
Earls of Breadalbane
battles
Jacobites
Glencoe Massacre
Act of Union
nobility
Glen Coe
First Earl of Breadalbane

John Campbell, 1st Earl of Breadalbane (1635 - 1717), was created Earl in 1681. John Campbell was descended from the Campbells of Glenorchy and as a supporter of William of Orange, he was employed to bribe the Jacobite clans into submission in 1691.

He orchestrated the Massacre of Glen Coe to make an example of clans with Jacobite sympathies. He was careful to cover his tracks, however, and no trace of his involvement was discovered at the time.

Although he did not vote for the Act of Union in 1707 he did serve as a representative peer in the united Parliament from 1713-1715. During the Jacobite rising of 1715 he gave nominal support to the Jacobites but declined from making it official. He died at the Battle of Sherrifmuir in March 1717.

This portrait is taken from 'A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments vol. 1' ed. by John S. Keltie

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First Earl of Breadalbane

1680s

Campbells; Earls of Breadalbane; battles; Jacobites; Glencoe Massacre; Act of Union; nobility; Glen Coe

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

John Campbell, 1st Earl of Breadalbane (1635 - 1717), was created Earl in 1681. John Campbell was descended from the Campbells of Glenorchy and as a supporter of William of Orange, he was employed to bribe the Jacobite clans into submission in 1691.<br /> <br /> He orchestrated the Massacre of Glen Coe to make an example of clans with Jacobite sympathies. He was careful to cover his tracks, however, and no trace of his involvement was discovered at the time. <br /> <br /> Although he did not vote for the Act of Union in 1707 he did serve as a representative peer in the united Parliament from 1713-1715. During the Jacobite rising of 1715 he gave nominal support to the Jacobites but declined from making it official. He died at the Battle of Sherrifmuir in March 1717. <br /> <br /> This portrait is taken from 'A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments vol. 1' ed. by John S. Keltie