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TITLE
Inverness at the end of the 17th century
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_159_456
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1874
PERIOD
1690s
CREATOR
Paterson
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30954
KEYWORDS
Inverness
towns
cities
battles
capitals
Royal Burghs
Culloden
Macbeth
Jacobites
buildings
churches
cathedrals
rivers
lochs
Caledonian Canal
canals
Inverness at the end of the 17th century

Inverness lies at the head of the Great Glen on the banks of the River Ness. It is often referred to as the capital of the Highlands.

Inverness was established as a Royal Burgh by King David in 1158. It has associations with Macbeth who built a castle there. In 1303 the town was occupied by English troops but it was subsequently passed to Robert the Bruce's supporters until 1508 when keepership passed to the Earl of Huntly during the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

Since the end of the 17th century, when this engraving was made, Inverness has seen the 1745 Jacobite Rising, culminating in the Battle of Culloden in 1746, the coming of the Caledonian Canal in 1822 and the only British Cabinet meeting to be held outside London. It took place in Inverness Town House in 1921 when Ireland rejected the King and Empire while Lloyd George was on holiday in Wester Ross.

Because of its involvement in so much of Scotland's violent history there are very few buildings of historic significance left in Inverness, the Old High Church being a notable exception, and much of the architecture dates from the 19th century.

Famously not a city due to the lack of spires on its Cathedral, Inverness was granted city status in 2000 as one of three Millennium Cities.

This illustration was taken from 'A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments vol. 1' ed. by John S. Keltie

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Inverness at the end of the 17th century

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1690s

Inverness; towns; cities; battles; capitals; Royal Burghs; Culloden; Macbeth; Jacobites; buildings; churches; cathedrals; rivers; lochs; Caledonian Canal; canals

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Inverness lies at the head of the Great Glen on the banks of the River Ness. It is often referred to as the capital of the Highlands. <br /> <br /> Inverness was established as a Royal Burgh by King David in 1158. It has associations with Macbeth who built a castle there. In 1303 the town was occupied by English troops but it was subsequently passed to Robert the Bruce's supporters until 1508 when keepership passed to the Earl of Huntly during the Glorious Revolution of 1688. <br /> <br /> Since the end of the 17th century, when this engraving was made, Inverness has seen the 1745 Jacobite Rising, culminating in the Battle of Culloden in 1746, the coming of the Caledonian Canal in 1822 and the only British Cabinet meeting to be held outside London. It took place in Inverness Town House in 1921 when Ireland rejected the King and Empire while Lloyd George was on holiday in Wester Ross. <br /> <br /> Because of its involvement in so much of Scotland's violent history there are very few buildings of historic significance left in Inverness, the Old High Church being a notable exception, and much of the architecture dates from the 19th century. <br /> <br /> Famously not a city due to the lack of spires on its Cathedral, Inverness was granted city status in 2000 as one of three Millennium Cities. <br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments vol. 1' ed. by John S. Keltie