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James Stuart. The Chevalier de St George. The Old Pretender

James Francis Edward Stuart (1688-1766) was the son of James II of Britain. As a Catholic, James II was deposed during the 'Glorious Revolution' in 1688. The family fled to France and, on the death of his father in 1701, James Stuart became the focus of the Jacobite cause. He was officially recognised in France as James III of Britain. In 1714 the Hanoverian George I came to the British throne and the Jacobites decided to capitalise on his unpopularity to stage an uprising and claim the throne back for the Stuart kings. The Earl of Mar was to lead the 1715 rising. Mar was not a particularly strong leader or military tactician and the important battle at Sheriffmuir proved to be inconclusive. James Stuart did not arrive in Scotland until after the battle at Sheriffmuir and by that time it was too late to save the rising from failure. James Stuart never returned to Scotland after the '15 Rising and passed the focus of the Jacobite cause onto his son, Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender.

This illustration was taken from 'A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments vol. 1' ed. by John S. Keltie

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James Stuart. The Chevalier de St George. The Old Pretender

1870s

James Stuart; The Old Pretender; Jacobites; Stuarts; Scottish Crown; battles; James II; James VII; Earl of Mar; Sheriffmuir; Charles Edward Stuart; Bonnie Prince Charlie; personalitiesed

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

James Francis Edward Stuart (1688-1766) was the son of James II of Britain. As a Catholic, James II was deposed during the 'Glorious Revolution' in 1688. The family fled to France and, on the death of his father in 1701, James Stuart became the focus of the Jacobite cause. He was officially recognised in France as James III of Britain. In 1714 the Hanoverian George I came to the British throne and the Jacobites decided to capitalise on his unpopularity to stage an uprising and claim the throne back for the Stuart kings. The Earl of Mar was to lead the 1715 rising. Mar was not a particularly strong leader or military tactician and the important battle at Sheriffmuir proved to be inconclusive. James Stuart did not arrive in Scotland until after the battle at Sheriffmuir and by that time it was too late to save the rising from failure. James Stuart never returned to Scotland after the '15 Rising and passed the focus of the Jacobite cause onto his son, Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender. <br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments vol. 1' ed. by John S. Keltie