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TITLE
Lieutenant General Wade
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_159_491
DATE OF IMAGE
1874
PERIOD
1740s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
30960
KEYWORDS
General Wade
roads
transport
Jacobites
Black Watch
West Highland Way
military roads
personalitiesed
Lieutenant General Wade

Lieutenant General George Wade (1673-1748) recognised the need for a good communications system to destroy the Jacobite support in the Highlands. He was employed, after the 1715 Jacobite Rising, to construct a system of metalled military roads and bridges.

Between 1724 and 1740 over 240 miles of road and 40 bridges were constructed connecting the mains centres of Perth, Fort William, Fort Augustus and Inverness. The intelligent choice of routes using the natural contours of the land ensured that many of the routes are still used today for walking and mountain biking. Other parts of the network have been built over with new roads following the same route. Large parts of the West Highland Way follow the old military roads.

In 1724 General Wade also recommended the recruitment of Highland troops under Gaelic-speaking officers and, as a result, revived the Black Watch. In 1742 Wade became a Privy Councillor and a Lieutenant General and in 1743 he became a Field Marshal in the army.

This illustration was taken from 'A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments vol. 1' ed. by John S. Keltie

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Lieutenant General Wade

1740s

General Wade; roads; transport; Jacobites; Black Watch; West Highland Way; military roads; personalitiesed

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Lieutenant General George Wade (1673-1748) recognised the need for a good communications system to destroy the Jacobite support in the Highlands. He was employed, after the 1715 Jacobite Rising, to construct a system of metalled military roads and bridges.<br /> <br /> Between 1724 and 1740 over 240 miles of road and 40 bridges were constructed connecting the mains centres of Perth, Fort William, Fort Augustus and Inverness. The intelligent choice of routes using the natural contours of the land ensured that many of the routes are still used today for walking and mountain biking. Other parts of the network have been built over with new roads following the same route. Large parts of the West Highland Way follow the old military roads. <br /> <br /> In 1724 General Wade also recommended the recruitment of Highland troops under Gaelic-speaking officers and, as a result, revived the Black Watch. In 1742 Wade became a Privy Councillor and a Lieutenant General and in 1743 he became a Field Marshal in the army. <br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'A History of the Scottish Highlands, Highland Clans and Highland Regiments vol. 1' ed. by John S. Keltie