Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (1 of 23)
EXTERNAL ID
ULMAUL_VOICES_FROM_PAST_01
PLACENAME
Ullapool
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donnie MacKenzie & Mary MacKenzie
SOURCE
Ullapool Museum
ASSET ID
3097
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2
bombs

Get Adobe Flash player

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.

Interviewer: Hi. Is ok if we ask you some questions about the war?

Mary: That's fine, yes.

Interviewer: We'll start with Mary. How old were you in the war?

Mary: I was eleven when war started.

Interviewer: So you weren't that old?

Interviewer: We know you lived in Ullapool but whereabouts did you live?

Mary: When war broke out I was living on Ladysmith Street.

Interviewer: Did war affect your school?

Mary: I can't say that it did, not really. You see, we were away from all the bombs and what have you. It was nice and peaceful up here.

Interviewer: Donnie, how old were you in the war?

Donnie: I went in when I was just coming - I wasn't eighteen. I was a month off, two months off being eighteen.

Interviewer: What did you serve in the war?

Donnie: What did I serve? In the army.

Interviewer: Yeh.

Donnie: Yeh.

Interviewer: Did you ever take part in a bombing?

Donnie: In - well, I experienced a part of the bombing before I went into the army actually in Fort William. I was working in the Forestry Commission down there when the Fort William factory got bombed and that bomb is still standing there today for anybody to see; it never exploded.

Interviewer: Cool.

Donnie: Did you see it?

Interviewer: No.

Interviewer: Have they taken the charges out of the bomb? Have they taken the charges out of the bomb?

Mary: Oh, I would think so.

Donnie: When war broke out you had to go where you were told to go which we were transferred from Braemore down to Fort William - Torlundy was the name of the place - and they had decoy which looked like the factory buildings, on the hillside, on the side of Ben Nevis actually. They just looked like canvas, you know, and they were built - made to look like buildings to draw the enemy, when they came over, they thought that that was part of the factory. And, when they came to bomb the factory they bombed all these - there's bomb craters still I suppose there's still down there today, on the hillside - but there was only one bomb that actually hit the factory at Fort William and it's just the one I'm telling you about that's still standing, it never exploded. But they did get the imitation buildings. That was all - they were all blown off the hillside. You know? So anyway, that was that and I call my calling up papers then to go into the army.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (1 of 23)

ROSS: Lochbroom

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2; bombs

Ullapool Museum

Voices From Their Past - Ullapool

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: Hi. Is ok if we ask you some questions about the war?<br /> <br /> Mary: That's fine, yes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: We'll start with Mary. How old were you in the war?<br /> <br /> Mary: I was eleven when war started.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So you weren't that old?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: We know you lived in Ullapool but whereabouts did you live?<br /> <br /> Mary: When war broke out I was living on Ladysmith Street.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did war affect your school?<br /> <br /> Mary: I can't say that it did, not really. You see, we were away from all the bombs and what have you. It was nice and peaceful up here.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Donnie, how old were you in the war?<br /> <br /> Donnie: I went in when I was just coming - I wasn't eighteen. I was a month off, two months off being eighteen.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: What did you serve in the war?<br /> <br /> Donnie: What did I serve? In the army.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yeh.<br /> <br /> Donnie: Yeh.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you ever take part in a bombing?<br /> <br /> Donnie: In - well, I experienced a part of the bombing before I went into the army actually in Fort William. I was working in the Forestry Commission down there when the Fort William factory got bombed and that bomb is still standing there today for anybody to see; it never exploded.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Cool.<br /> <br /> Donnie: Did you see it?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: No.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Have they taken the charges out of the bomb? Have they taken the charges out of the bomb?<br /> <br /> Mary: Oh, I would think so.<br /> <br /> Donnie: When war broke out you had to go where you were told to go which we were transferred from Braemore down to Fort William - Torlundy was the name of the place - and they had decoy which looked like the factory buildings, on the hillside, on the side of Ben Nevis actually. They just looked like canvas, you know, and they were built - made to look like buildings to draw the enemy, when they came over, they thought that that was part of the factory. And, when they came to bomb the factory they bombed all these - there's bomb craters still I suppose there's still down there today, on the hillside - but there was only one bomb that actually hit the factory at Fort William and it's just the one I'm telling you about that's still standing, it never exploded. But they did get the imitation buildings. That was all - they were all blown off the hillside. You know? So anyway, that was that and I call my calling up papers then to go into the army.