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TITLE
Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (3 of 23)
EXTERNAL ID
ULMAUL_VOICES_FROM_PAST_03
PLACENAME
Ullapool
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donnie MacKenzie & Mary MacKenzie
SOURCE
Ullapool Museum
ASSET ID
3100
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2
Burma Campaign
Burmese Campaign
Chindit
Chindits
Slim's Forgottern Army

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This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.

'We landed in at a place they called - they had three different areas - there was one area called White City; one area was called Aberdeen; and the other area was called Broadway; and another one - I've already said White City, yes. So we, our 111 Brigade - that was our brigade - we went into Broadway. The other brigades, there was five brigades altogether; they went into the other areas. The 111 Brigade was the biggest brigade and we were on Broadway, and as we were flown in all these gliders, they hadn't a clue where they were going, there was only a strip cut out of the jungle for the Dakotas to land on. Well, the gliders were let loose before the Dakotas came down. They were left - they were untied from the Dakotas and they just came down in the jungle and they just landed and they just broke up into pieces, so we had to find our way from there after we came out of the gliders. The Dakotas, I mean, they couldn't take off again. Once they landed they were finished. That was it. That's all they could do. They couldn't take off again. So we moved ourselves into the jungle then and made some sort of fortification for ourselves, and we took an area of the jungle, a little hillock, it was, as I said already, not so big as Beinn Ghobhlach, that was sitting in the heart of the jungle, so we put the Dakotases in barbed wire, it's, you know, like coils of barbed wire. So we got this round the perimeter of where we were and we waited. There was no sign of the Japs, no sign of the Japs coming, no contact at all where we were landing, and we managed to get into this built up fortress that we'd made for ourselves in there with this barbed wire, and it was about a week after we went in there that the Japanese actually discovered where we were. And once they discovered where we were they were sending out patrols the same as we were - deep, what they call deep penetration patrols - we used to go out at night, you know? Most of the walking was done by night and, it was on the - as I said earlier on - it was right on the edge of the Burmese Railway Line, the Burmese road, and all their, all their heavy equipment was going up that road, up to the Indian border and our job was to demolish them, destroy them, before they got up there. So we went out on patrols at night, laid booby traps on the railway lines, and as soon as the trains came they were just blown high sky. And they were - same with the roads. And then we used to disperse into the jungle, lie in over there again until the following night, and we just kept on doing that all the time'

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Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (3 of 23)

ROSS: Lochbroom

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2; Burma Campaign; Burmese Campaign; Chindit; Chindits; Slim's Forgottern Army

Ullapool Museum

Voices From Their Past - Ullapool

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School. <br /> <br /> 'We landed in at a place they called - they had three different areas - there was one area called White City; one area was called Aberdeen; and the other area was called Broadway; and another one - I've already said White City, yes. So we, our 111 Brigade - that was our brigade - we went into Broadway. The other brigades, there was five brigades altogether; they went into the other areas. The 111 Brigade was the biggest brigade and we were on Broadway, and as we were flown in all these gliders, they hadn't a clue where they were going, there was only a strip cut out of the jungle for the Dakotas to land on. Well, the gliders were let loose before the Dakotas came down. They were left - they were untied from the Dakotas and they just came down in the jungle and they just landed and they just broke up into pieces, so we had to find our way from there after we came out of the gliders. The Dakotas, I mean, they couldn't take off again. Once they landed they were finished. That was it. That's all they could do. They couldn't take off again. So we moved ourselves into the jungle then and made some sort of fortification for ourselves, and we took an area of the jungle, a little hillock, it was, as I said already, not so big as Beinn Ghobhlach, that was sitting in the heart of the jungle, so we put the Dakotases in barbed wire, it's, you know, like coils of barbed wire. So we got this round the perimeter of where we were and we waited. There was no sign of the Japs, no sign of the Japs coming, no contact at all where we were landing, and we managed to get into this built up fortress that we'd made for ourselves in there with this barbed wire, and it was about a week after we went in there that the Japanese actually discovered where we were. And once they discovered where we were they were sending out patrols the same as we were - deep, what they call deep penetration patrols - we used to go out at night, you know? Most of the walking was done by night and, it was on the - as I said earlier on - it was right on the edge of the Burmese Railway Line, the Burmese road, and all their, all their heavy equipment was going up that road, up to the Indian border and our job was to demolish them, destroy them, before they got up there. So we went out on patrols at night, laid booby traps on the railway lines, and as soon as the trains came they were just blown high sky. And they were - same with the roads. And then we used to disperse into the jungle, lie in over there again until the following night, and we just kept on doing that all the time'