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TITLE
Geology of Loch Staffin
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_180_P070
PLACENAME
Loch Staffin
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmuir
DATE OF IMAGE
1854
PERIOD
1850s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31004
KEYWORDS
rocks
geology
clays
layers
stones
Geology of Loch Staffin

The layers of geological interest at Loch Staffin on Skye are represented by letters.
a - Lias (a limestone rock)
b - inferior oolite (oolite means 'roe-stone' on the basis that the rock's granular structure looks like fish eggs.)
c - Middle oolite
d - imperfectly columnar basalt
e - Estuary shales (soft grey rock which breaks easily into layers)
f - Oxford clay (a type of marine clay containing many fossils)
g - Amygdaloidal trap (small cavities in igneous rock that are filled with deposits of different minerals)

This illustration was taken from 'Guide to the Island of Skye', published by Adam and Charles Black, Edinburgh (1854?)

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Geology of Loch Staffin

INVERNESS: Kilmuir

1850s

rocks; geology; clays; layers; stones

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The layers of geological interest at Loch Staffin on Skye are represented by letters.<br /> a - Lias (a limestone rock)<br /> b - inferior oolite (oolite means 'roe-stone' on the basis that the rock's granular structure looks like fish eggs.)<br /> c - Middle oolite<br /> d - imperfectly columnar basalt<br /> e - Estuary shales (soft grey rock which breaks easily into layers)<br /> f - Oxford clay (a type of marine clay containing many fossils)<br /> g - Amygdaloidal trap (small cavities in igneous rock that are filled with deposits of different minerals)<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Guide to the Island of Skye', published by Adam and Charles Black, Edinburgh (1854?)