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TITLE
Schiehallion from the north east end of Loch Rannoch
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_205_P032
PLACENAME
Schiehallion
DISTRICT
Highland
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
PERTH: Fortingall
DATE OF IMAGE
1866
CREATOR
W & A K Johnston
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31012
KEYWORDS
mountains
Munros
hills
lochs
hill walking
munro bagging
Schiehallion from the north east end of Loch Rannoch

Loch Rannoch runs for 10 miles east to west. It has an area of 1917 hectares (4737 acres), and reaches a depth of 440ft (134m). At the south end of the loch is Schiehallion.

Schiehallion is a Munro which reaches to 3552ft (1083m). A Munro is defined as any Scottish mountain or distinct peak which rises to a height of 3000ft or more above sea level. Because of its isolated position at the centre of Scotland, Schiehallion can be seen from a great distance all round. Its name is usually translated as 'The Fairy Hill of the Caledonians'.

Schiehallion was used as the location for an experiment by the then Astronomer Royal, Nevil Maskelyne (1732-1811), when he measured the deflection of a pendulum on the mountain's slopes to determine the mass of the earth.

This illustration can be found in 'Concise Historical Proofs respecting the Gael of Alban', by James A Robertson

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Schiehallion from the north east end of Loch Rannoch

PERTH: Fortingall

mountains; Munros; hills; lochs; hill walking; munro bagging

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Loch Rannoch runs for 10 miles east to west. It has an area of 1917 hectares (4737 acres), and reaches a depth of 440ft (134m). At the south end of the loch is Schiehallion.<br /> <br /> Schiehallion is a Munro which reaches to 3552ft (1083m). A Munro is defined as any Scottish mountain or distinct peak which rises to a height of 3000ft or more above sea level. Because of its isolated position at the centre of Scotland, Schiehallion can be seen from a great distance all round. Its name is usually translated as 'The Fairy Hill of the Caledonians'.<br /> <br /> Schiehallion was used as the location for an experiment by the then Astronomer Royal, Nevil Maskelyne (1732-1811), when he measured the deflection of a pendulum on the mountain's slopes to determine the mass of the earth.<br /> <br /> This illustration can be found in 'Concise Historical Proofs respecting the Gael of Alban', by James A Robertson