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TITLE
Strathpeffer in the Olden Times
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_218_P001
PLACENAME
Strathpeffer
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Fodderty
DATE OF IMAGE
1899
PERIOD
800s; 900s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31017
KEYWORDS
Strathpeffer
spas
springs
waters
sulphur
villages
stones
Pictish stones
Brahan Seer
predictions
prophecies
zoomable

The Victorian village of Strathpeffer takes its name from the valley (or strath) which it sits in.

Before the 1700s there was little to be seen. The village owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs in the 1700s. The springs were declared the most healthy in Britain and people came from across Europe and beyond to visit. Its popularity declined between the 1st and 2nd World Wars and the railway closed in the 1960s.

Strathpeffer also has its own prophecy by the Brahan Seer. He said that if the Eagle Stone (a small Pictish stone in the village) were to fall over three times then the valley would be flooded. The stone is now firmly cemented down.

This illustration was taken from 'History of the Ancient Province of Ross' by Robert Bain

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Strathpeffer in the Olden Times

ROSS: Fodderty

800s; 900s

Strathpeffer; spas; springs; waters; sulphur; villages; stones; Pictish stones; Brahan Seer; predictions; prophecies; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (maps)

The Victorian village of Strathpeffer takes its name from the valley (or strath) which it sits in.<br /> <br /> Before the 1700s there was little to be seen. The village owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs in the 1700s. The springs were declared the most healthy in Britain and people came from across Europe and beyond to visit. Its popularity declined between the 1st and 2nd World Wars and the railway closed in the 1960s.<br /> <br /> Strathpeffer also has its own prophecy by the Brahan Seer. He said that if the Eagle Stone (a small Pictish stone in the village) were to fall over three times then the valley would be flooded. The stone is now firmly cemented down.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'History of the Ancient Province of Ross' by Robert Bain