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TITLE
Dun Mac Sniachan, nr Benderloch, Argyll & Bute
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_222_P147
PLACENAME
Benderloch
DISTRICT
North Lorn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Ardchattan and Muckairn
DATE OF IMAGE
1879
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31024
KEYWORDS
Loch Etive
Sons of Uisnach
Ardmucknish Bay
hill forts
hill-forts
vitrified forts
Fergus
Selma
Dun Mac Sniachan, nr Benderloch, Argyll & Bute

On a steep isolated ridge between the village of Benderloch and the northeast shore of Ardmucknish Bay are the remains of two vitrified forts and a dun. The area is known as 'Dun Mac Sniachan' or Bergonium, the castle of Fergus & Selma.

A vitrified fort is one in which the ramparts have been burnt at such high
temperatures that the stones have been fused into a glassy mass. The burning may have been accidental, intentional to strengthen the walls, or it may have been a consequence of war.

The illustration is from 'Loch Etive and The Sons of Uisnach', published by MacMillan & Co, 1879

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Dun Mac Sniachan, nr Benderloch, Argyll & Bute

ARGYLL: Ardchattan and Muckairn

1870s

Loch Etive; Sons of Uisnach; Ardmucknish Bay; hill forts; hill-forts; vitrified forts; Fergus; Selma

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

On a steep isolated ridge between the village of Benderloch and the northeast shore of Ardmucknish Bay are the remains of two vitrified forts and a dun. The area is known as 'Dun Mac Sniachan' or Bergonium, the castle of Fergus & Selma. <br /> <br /> A vitrified fort is one in which the ramparts have been burnt at such high <br /> temperatures that the stones have been fused into a glassy mass. The burning may have been accidental, intentional to strengthen the walls, or it may have been a consequence of war.<br /> <br /> The illustration is from 'Loch Etive and The Sons of Uisnach', published by MacMillan & Co, 1879