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TITLE
Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (5 of 23)
EXTERNAL ID
ULMAUL_VOICES_FROM_PAST_05
PLACENAME
Ullapool
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donnie MacKenzie & Mary MacKenzie
SOURCE
Ullapool Museum
ASSET ID
3103
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2
Burma Campaign
Burmese Campaign
Chindit
Chindits
Slim's Forgottern Army

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This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.

Donnie: We kept moving all the time, all the time, and we were in touch with the others - what we called walkie-talkies - that was our only means of communication we had with the other, the other forts (we called them forts) and we used to have to go and deliver messages from one fort to the other, you know, through the jungle, following elephant tracks. And we had a map about that size - it was made of canvas - which the walking wouldn't destroy and we had each, each member issued with a compass and one of these maps and we had to make our own way with the compass and the map from fort one to fort two. Sometimes we were ambushed on the elephant tracks and, it's very hard to say this, but I lost one of my best mates you know, doing that, conveying a message. There were two of us were sent out on a message to deliver to one fort from the other, from our commanding officer, and we went to deliver it and on our way back we lost our bearings on the elephant tracks in the jungle. We weren't sure whether it was this way, that way, or the other way. And we stood at the junction of the elephant track and we were debating which was the right track to get back to our own fort. And his name was Paige, funnily enough, this boy, from Bradford, and he said, 'Well, I'll tell you what we'll do.' He says, 'If you go so far up that track, I'll go up so far at this track; we might get our bearings that way.' Well, Paige never came back, never came back, and we, we said, 'Well, I take - I'm not going looking for him. I'll just come back to the fort and I'll tell them that Paige is missing.' So I was on the right track but he was on the wrong track, and he ran into a Japanese patrol. So, following that, when I went back and I told my commanding officers that Paige was missing, so they sent out a recee in the morning and they found his body with his head off. Aye. That's all they got. He just ran into a Japanese patrol and they just - they had, they had big - you know, the Japanese big knives, like?

Interviewers: Yeh. Yeh.

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Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (5 of 23)

ROSS: Lochbroom

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2; Burma Campaign; Burmese Campaign; Chindit; Chindits; Slim's Forgottern Army

Ullapool Museum

Voices From Their Past - Ullapool

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.<br /> <br /> Donnie: We kept moving all the time, all the time, and we were in touch with the others - what we called walkie-talkies - that was our only means of communication we had with the other, the other forts (we called them forts) and we used to have to go and deliver messages from one fort to the other, you know, through the jungle, following elephant tracks. And we had a map about that size - it was made of canvas - which the walking wouldn't destroy and we had each, each member issued with a compass and one of these maps and we had to make our own way with the compass and the map from fort one to fort two. Sometimes we were ambushed on the elephant tracks and, it's very hard to say this, but I lost one of my best mates you know, doing that, conveying a message. There were two of us were sent out on a message to deliver to one fort from the other, from our commanding officer, and we went to deliver it and on our way back we lost our bearings on the elephant tracks in the jungle. We weren't sure whether it was this way, that way, or the other way. And we stood at the junction of the elephant track and we were debating which was the right track to get back to our own fort. And his name was Paige, funnily enough, this boy, from Bradford, and he said, 'Well, I'll tell you what we'll do.' He says, 'If you go so far up that track, I'll go up so far at this track; we might get our bearings that way.' Well, Paige never came back, never came back, and we, we said, 'Well, I take - I'm not going looking for him. I'll just come back to the fort and I'll tell them that Paige is missing.' So I was on the right track but he was on the wrong track, and he ran into a Japanese patrol. So, following that, when I went back and I told my commanding officers that Paige was missing, so they sent out a recee in the morning and they found his body with his head off. Aye. That's all they got. He just ran into a Japanese patrol and they just - they had, they had big - you know, the Japanese big knives, like?<br /> <br /> Interviewers: Yeh. Yeh.