Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Fulmar and Storm Petrel
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_227_P054
DATE OF IMAGE
1698
PERIOD
1690s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31044
KEYWORDS
birds
sea birds
wildlife
Fulmar and Storm Petrel

The fulmar is a grey and white bird which looks similar to a seagull but is related to the albatross. The birds feed in flocks at sea, eating fish waste and crustaceans. Fulmars tend to fly low over the sea but will soar up to their breeding grounds high on cliff faces. They defend their nests from intruders by spitting out a foul-smelling oily substance.

The Assilag or Storm Petrel is a bird a little larger than a common sparrow. It is almost entirely black but has a distinctive white end. Like the fulmar, the storm petrel feeds in flocks out at sea and will often follow the wakes of ships in search of fish, plankton and crustaceans. It nests on offshore islands in cliffs and walls.

This illustration is taken from 'A Late Voyage to St Kilda, the Remotest of all the Hebrides, or Western Isles of Scotland', by M Martin. London: Brown & Godwin, 1698

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Fulmar and Storm Petrel

1690s

birds; sea birds; wildlife

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The fulmar is a grey and white bird which looks similar to a seagull but is related to the albatross. The birds feed in flocks at sea, eating fish waste and crustaceans. Fulmars tend to fly low over the sea but will soar up to their breeding grounds high on cliff faces. They defend their nests from intruders by spitting out a foul-smelling oily substance.<br /> <br /> The Assilag or Storm Petrel is a bird a little larger than a common sparrow. It is almost entirely black but has a distinctive white end. Like the fulmar, the storm petrel feeds in flocks out at sea and will often follow the wakes of ships in search of fish, plankton and crustaceans. It nests on offshore islands in cliffs and walls.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'A Late Voyage to St Kilda, the Remotest of all the Hebrides, or Western Isles of Scotland', by M Martin. London: Brown & Godwin, 1698