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TITLE
Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (6 of 23)
EXTERNAL ID
ULMAUL_VOICES_FROM_PAST_06
PLACENAME
Ullapool
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donnie MacKenzie & Mary MacKenzie
SOURCE
Ullapool Museum
ASSET ID
3105
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2
Burma Campaign
Burmese Campaign
Chindit
Chindits
Slim's Forgottern Army

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This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.

Donnie: They bombed us; they plastered us with everything they could plaster us with. There wasn't a tree left standing on that mountain - a jungle mind you? There was nothing left standing on it. And we were under the ground, in foxholes. And as the commanding officer said to us, 'Now', he says, 'I'm afraid it's every man for himself from zero hour - whatever zero hour was - and it's up to yourselves to get off. If you don't get off, you don't get off. If you get off, you're lucky.' So there was three of us in this first foxhole and we debated, 'What are we going to do?' And, I know, if we came out and showed ourselves that was it, we were finished, because we could actually hear them talking - the Japanese - talking, and we were under the ground. And we just lay there until the darkening came in - we decided to do this - and then when daylight came out in the morning, we decided to creep out and we went - crawled on our bellies - I don't know how far we travelled on our bellies - this sort of, we wouldn't be seen, and we got into the jungle, right into the jungle again and we hid ourselves in the jungle. And we were living on bamboo shoots and for our - say, three to four days - nothing else. And then we heard voices and we thought it was the Japanese and we just, more or less, 'This, is it. We've had it.' But it turned out to be Gurkhas and these Gurkhas were sent out to look out - to try and find out some sick or wounded that might be living and we were fortunate enough to be picked up by Gurkhas. After a while, they decided - the Gurkhas fed us on tea and they were really good at making tea, the Gurkhas. We enjoyed their tea.

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Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (6 of 23)

ROSS: Lochbroom

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2; Burma Campaign; Burmese Campaign; Chindit; Chindits; Slim's Forgottern Army

Ullapool Museum

Voices From Their Past - Ullapool

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School. <br /> <br /> Donnie: They bombed us; they plastered us with everything they could plaster us with. There wasn't a tree left standing on that mountain - a jungle mind you? There was nothing left standing on it. And we were under the ground, in foxholes. And as the commanding officer said to us, 'Now', he says, 'I'm afraid it's every man for himself from zero hour - whatever zero hour was - and it's up to yourselves to get off. If you don't get off, you don't get off. If you get off, you're lucky.' So there was three of us in this first foxhole and we debated, 'What are we going to do?' And, I know, if we came out and showed ourselves that was it, we were finished, because we could actually hear them talking - the Japanese - talking, and we were under the ground. And we just lay there until the darkening came in - we decided to do this - and then when daylight came out in the morning, we decided to creep out and we went - crawled on our bellies - I don't know how far we travelled on our bellies - this sort of, we wouldn't be seen, and we got into the jungle, right into the jungle again and we hid ourselves in the jungle. And we were living on bamboo shoots and for our - say, three to four days - nothing else. And then we heard voices and we thought it was the Japanese and we just, more or less, 'This, is it. We've had it.' But it turned out to be Gurkhas and these Gurkhas were sent out to look out - to try and find out some sick or wounded that might be living and we were fortunate enough to be picked up by Gurkhas. After a while, they decided - the Gurkhas fed us on tea and they were really good at making tea, the Gurkhas. We enjoyed their tea.