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TITLE
Cromarty
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_250_98
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
DATE OF IMAGE
1801
PERIOD
1800s
CREATOR
Mr Nattes / Merigot
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31052
KEYWORDS
Cromarty
Cromarty Firth
Black Isle
fishing
boats
National Trust for Scotland
Royal Navy
George Ross
piers
ferries
Cromarty

'The town and harbour of Cromarty, on the south side, is introduced, as if to perfect the scene, in a beautiful bay; it consists of neat new-built houses, is ornamented with a pier, and overlooked by the house and grounds of the proprietor'. Taken from 'Remarks on Local Scenery and Manners in Scotland' vol.2 by John Stoddart.

Cromarty is located on the northern tip of the Black Isle, about 15 miles north east of Inverness. It was bought in 1772 by George Ross of Pitkerie. He invested a great deal of money in the town, building a pier to encourage the fishing trade, cloth, rope and ironware factories, and the Gaelic Church and Cromarty House. Cromarty prospered until new roads into the Highlands by-passed the Black Isle. This led to a downturn in the fishing trade and a drop in population. Cromarty was used as a ferry port for centuries and it was on the main coastal route from Inverness. The Cromarty Firth, being sheltered, deep and easily defended, was an important haven used by the Royal Navy in both World Wars.

Cromarty is now regarded as one of the best preserved 18th Century towns in the Highlands and the town and county councils are working with the Civic Trust and the National Trust for Scotland to keep the area as a conservation village

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Cromarty

ROSS: Cromarty

1800s

Cromarty; Cromarty Firth; Black Isle; fishing; boats; National Trust for Scotland; Royal Navy; George Ross; piers; ferries

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

'The town and harbour of Cromarty, on the south side, is introduced, as if to perfect the scene, in a beautiful bay; it consists of neat new-built houses, is ornamented with a pier, and overlooked by the house and grounds of the proprietor'. Taken from 'Remarks on Local Scenery and Manners in Scotland' vol.2 by John Stoddart. <br /> <br /> Cromarty is located on the northern tip of the Black Isle, about 15 miles north east of Inverness. It was bought in 1772 by George Ross of Pitkerie. He invested a great deal of money in the town, building a pier to encourage the fishing trade, cloth, rope and ironware factories, and the Gaelic Church and Cromarty House. Cromarty prospered until new roads into the Highlands by-passed the Black Isle. This led to a downturn in the fishing trade and a drop in population. Cromarty was used as a ferry port for centuries and it was on the main coastal route from Inverness. The Cromarty Firth, being sheltered, deep and easily defended, was an important haven used by the Royal Navy in both World Wars.<br /> <br /> Cromarty is now regarded as one of the best preserved 18th Century towns in the Highlands and the town and county councils are working with the Civic Trust and the National Trust for Scotland to keep the area as a conservation village