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TITLE
Stirling Castle
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_250_228
PLACENAME
Stirling Castle
DISTRICT
Stirling
DATE OF IMAGE
1801
PERIOD
1800s
CREATOR
Mr Nattes / Merigot
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31057
KEYWORDS
Stirling Castle
castles
battles
Stirling Bridge
Bannockburn
Robert the Bruce
buildings
monarchs
kings
queens
armies
Jacobites
Wars of Independence
Stirling Castle

The original date of Stirling Castle is difficult to pinpoint. It is first recorded in the early 12th Century when Alexander I had the chapel dedicated, although it is highly likely that the site was used previously. It stands at a strategically central location between the Highlands and the Lowlands, guarding the lowest crossing point of the Forth. The control of the castle was extremely important in the control of the whole of Scotland.

The castle features heavily in the Wars of Independence, with the battles of Stirling Bridge (1297) and Bannockburn (1314) taking place nearby. Robert the Bruce tried to destroy the castle's fortifications after Bannockburn to prevent the English from using the castle again. The English had regained control of the castle by 1336 but it was back in Scottish hands five years later.

Successive monarchs from James I to James VI used the castle as a royal residence and most of the castle as it is seen today dates from 1370 to 1750. In the early 18th century the castle was used as a garrison fort and held out during the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. After that the castle was used as an army barracks for the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders until 1964. The castle is now under the protection of Historic Scotland.

Illustration taken from 'Remarks on Local Scenery and Manners in Scotland' vol.2 by John Stoddart

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Stirling Castle

1800s

Stirling Castle; castles; battles; Stirling Bridge; Bannockburn; Robert the Bruce; buildings; monarchs; kings; queens; armies; Jacobites; Wars of Independence

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The original date of Stirling Castle is difficult to pinpoint. It is first recorded in the early 12th Century when Alexander I had the chapel dedicated, although it is highly likely that the site was used previously. It stands at a strategically central location between the Highlands and the Lowlands, guarding the lowest crossing point of the Forth. The control of the castle was extremely important in the control of the whole of Scotland. <br /> <br /> The castle features heavily in the Wars of Independence, with the battles of Stirling Bridge (1297) and Bannockburn (1314) taking place nearby. Robert the Bruce tried to destroy the castle's fortifications after Bannockburn to prevent the English from using the castle again. The English had regained control of the castle by 1336 but it was back in Scottish hands five years later. <br /> <br /> Successive monarchs from James I to James VI used the castle as a royal residence and most of the castle as it is seen today dates from 1370 to 1750. In the early 18th century the castle was used as a garrison fort and held out during the Jacobite Risings of 1715 and 1745. After that the castle was used as an army barracks for the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders until 1964. The castle is now under the protection of Historic Scotland. <br /> <br /> Illustration taken from 'Remarks on Local Scenery and Manners in Scotland' vol.2 by John Stoddart