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TITLE
Sgurr Fhuaran and Sgurr na Carnach
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_287_P002
PLACENAME
Sgurr Fhuaran & Sgurr na Carnach
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Glenshiel
DATE OF IMAGE
1890
PERIOD
1890s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31068
KEYWORDS
hillwalking
Munroes
hills
mountains
Five Sisters of Kintail
walking
Sgurr Fhuaran and Sgurr na Carnach

Sgurr Fhuaran and Sgurr na Carnach are two of the peaks that make up the Five Sisters of Kintail. Sgurr Fhuaran is the tallest of the peaks at 3501ft (1067m) and Sgurr na Carnach is 3287ft (1002m). The Five Sisters of Kintail are a small mountain range to the north and west of Glen Sheil. Three of the peaks are Munros (Scottish mountains over 3000ft) and two are Munro tops (peak over 3000ft but without enough distance between it and the next to qualify as a separate Munro).

This illustration is taken from 'Scenes and Stories from the North of Scotland' by John Sinclair

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Sgurr Fhuaran and Sgurr na Carnach

ROSS: Glenshiel

1890s

hillwalking; Munroes; hills; mountains; Five Sisters of Kintail; walking

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Sgurr Fhuaran and Sgurr na Carnach are two of the peaks that make up the Five Sisters of Kintail. Sgurr Fhuaran is the tallest of the peaks at 3501ft (1067m) and Sgurr na Carnach is 3287ft (1002m). The Five Sisters of Kintail are a small mountain range to the north and west of Glen Sheil. Three of the peaks are Munros (Scottish mountains over 3000ft) and two are Munro tops (peak over 3000ft but without enough distance between it and the next to qualify as a separate Munro).<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'Scenes and Stories from the North of Scotland' by John Sinclair