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TITLE
Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (8 of 23)
EXTERNAL ID
ULMAUL_VOICES_FROM_PAST_08
PLACENAME
Ullapool
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donnie MacKenzie & Mary MacKenzie
SOURCE
Ullapool Museum
ASSET ID
3108
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2
Burma Campaign
Burmese Campaign
Chindit
Chindits
Slim's Forgottern Army

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This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.

Interviewer: When did you get home from the war?

Donnie: That's what I was going to say. I got back on compassionate grounds, you know? Mrs. Mitford, she was our representative here, was our Welfare Officer, you know, for the community, and my mother was on her death bed and Mrs. Mitford did her utmost to get me home, through the War Office. And after I came out of that convalescence we were sent to a place in India called Punah and we were - that - we were reorganised, and the battalion was reorganising, rebuilding it, and the next - our next step was the invasion of Singapore. That was to be our next move. But as it so happened the atom bomb came in and the invasion never come off. The regiment did go to Singapore but there was a lot of sabotage going on, you know, after the war had been more or less finished like, you know? The Japanese were still resisting in pockets, in Singapore. But anyway when I came home - going back to that - Mrs. Mitford, through the War Office, got me out on compassionate grounds and I was sent from the convalescence camp down to Bombay and I came home on the ship 'Strathnaven' and the sick and the wounded came back on the same ship, you know? And there was some pathetic cases; I remember one morning, coming through the Red Sea, and I was lying on the top deck and the sun was blazing hot down, and this fellow jumped over the top of me, right over the top of the side of the ship, right into the sea. He was, as I said already, 'Doolally', you know? This is where that expression came from. And these soldiers, these boys that were in that state of mind, they were taken into the washhouses before the rest of the troops were allowed into the washhouse, on the, on the ship, and that's how they were on the go and this fellow escaped from them and this is what he did.

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Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (8 of 23)

ROSS: Lochbroom

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2; Burma Campaign; Burmese Campaign; Chindit; Chindits; Slim's Forgottern Army

Ullapool Museum

Voices From Their Past - Ullapool

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: When did you get home from the war?<br /> <br /> Donnie: That's what I was going to say. I got back on compassionate grounds, you know? Mrs. Mitford, she was our representative here, was our Welfare Officer, you know, for the community, and my mother was on her death bed and Mrs. Mitford did her utmost to get me home, through the War Office. And after I came out of that convalescence we were sent to a place in India called Punah and we were - that - we were reorganised, and the battalion was reorganising, rebuilding it, and the next - our next step was the invasion of Singapore. That was to be our next move. But as it so happened the atom bomb came in and the invasion never come off. The regiment did go to Singapore but there was a lot of sabotage going on, you know, after the war had been more or less finished like, you know? The Japanese were still resisting in pockets, in Singapore. But anyway when I came home - going back to that - Mrs. Mitford, through the War Office, got me out on compassionate grounds and I was sent from the convalescence camp down to Bombay and I came home on the ship 'Strathnaven' and the sick and the wounded came back on the same ship, you know? And there was some pathetic cases; I remember one morning, coming through the Red Sea, and I was lying on the top deck and the sun was blazing hot down, and this fellow jumped over the top of me, right over the top of the side of the ship, right into the sea. He was, as I said already, 'Doolally', you know? This is where that expression came from. And these soldiers, these boys that were in that state of mind, they were taken into the washhouses before the rest of the troops were allowed into the washhouse, on the, on the ship, and that's how they were on the go and this fellow escaped from them and this is what he did.