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TITLE
Fishing Station at Loch Torridon
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_348_P105
PLACENAME
Loch Torridon
DISTRICT
Lochcarron
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Applecross
DATE OF IMAGE
1791
PERIOD
1790s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31086
KEYWORDS
fishing
methods
fishing stations
buildings
wharves
curers
curing
coppers
fish
salt houses
Fishing Station at Loch Torridon

The building in this illustration was erected by Mr MacKenzie, the proprietor of the fishing station. It consists of a stage and wharf of about 80ft long by 20ft wide. The wharf extends 18ft over a rock about 7ft above the high water mark. The wharf was covered which meant that fish could still be landed, split and cleaned, even in bad weather. The salt house was next to the wharf and had room for a curer and a cooper which meant that the fish could be salted and put in barrels without being transported any distance first. The walls of the building could also be opened or closed to take into account the changeable weather.

This illustration is taken from 'Prospects and Observations on a Tour in England and Scotland' by Thomas Newte

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Fishing Station at Loch Torridon

ROSS: Applecross

1790s

fishing; methods; fishing stations; buildings; wharves; curers; curing; coppers; fish; salt houses

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The building in this illustration was erected by Mr MacKenzie, the proprietor of the fishing station. It consists of a stage and wharf of about 80ft long by 20ft wide. The wharf extends 18ft over a rock about 7ft above the high water mark. The wharf was covered which meant that fish could still be landed, split and cleaned, even in bad weather. The salt house was next to the wharf and had room for a curer and a cooper which meant that the fish could be salted and put in barrels without being transported any distance first. The walls of the building could also be opened or closed to take into account the changeable weather.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'Prospects and Observations on a Tour in England and Scotland' by Thomas Newte