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TITLE
Perth
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_348_P211
PLACENAME
Perth
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
PERTH
DATE OF IMAGE
1791
PERIOD
1790s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31089
KEYWORDS
Perth
towns
buildings
parks
Scone
River Tay
rivers
armies
Reformation
Covenanters
Jacobites
Perth

Perth is located at the centre of Scotland, built at an important crossing at the highest point of tidal water on the River Tay. A settlement had been located at this point of the river since the Roman fort Bertha in about 83AD. It has long been an important trading point.

The strategic significance of the crossing point of the Tay was not lost on the various armies who found themselves in Perth throughout the centuries. During the Wars of Independence Perth was heavily fortified and held by the English until Robert the Bruce captured it in 1313. Perth has also seen armies owing allegiance to the Covenanters, the Jacobites and Oliver Cromwell.

As Perth is so close to Scone, the ancient seat of power in Scotland, it was hoped that it would become the capital. This hope was crushed in 1437 with the murder of James I at Perth and the subsequent crowning of the six-year-old James II in Edinburgh as his mother felt it was safer.
Perth also saw the beginning of the Reformation in Scotland when John Knox gave a sermon, instigating reformation, in St John's Kirk.

Perth is known as "The Fair City" with its twin public parks of the North Inch and the South Inch.

This illustration is taken from 'Prospects and Observations on a Tour in England and Scotland' by Thomas Newte

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Perth

PERTH

1790s

Perth; towns; buildings; parks; Scone; River Tay; rivers; armies; Reformation; Covenanters; Jacobites

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Perth is located at the centre of Scotland, built at an important crossing at the highest point of tidal water on the River Tay. A settlement had been located at this point of the river since the Roman fort Bertha in about 83AD. It has long been an important trading point. <br /> <br /> The strategic significance of the crossing point of the Tay was not lost on the various armies who found themselves in Perth throughout the centuries. During the Wars of Independence Perth was heavily fortified and held by the English until Robert the Bruce captured it in 1313. Perth has also seen armies owing allegiance to the Covenanters, the Jacobites and Oliver Cromwell. <br /> <br /> As Perth is so close to Scone, the ancient seat of power in Scotland, it was hoped that it would become the capital. This hope was crushed in 1437 with the murder of James I at Perth and the subsequent crowning of the six-year-old James II in Edinburgh as his mother felt it was safer. <br /> Perth also saw the beginning of the Reformation in Scotland when John Knox gave a sermon, instigating reformation, in St John's Kirk. <br /> <br /> Perth is known as "The Fair City" with its twin public parks of the North Inch and the South Inch. <br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'Prospects and Observations on a Tour in England and Scotland' by Thomas Newte