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TITLE
View of Kinloch Rannoch
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_349_P265
PLACENAME
Kinloch Rannoch
DISTRICT
Highland
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
PERTH: Fortingall
DATE OF IMAGE
1802
PERIOD
1800s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31093
KEYWORDS
Kinloch Rannoch
Loch Rannoch
Jacobite Uprisings
Jacobite Rebellions
River Tummel
View of Kinloch Rannoch

Kinloch Rannoch village lies at the east end of Loch Rannoch in Highland Perthshire. Its roots lie in the aftermath of the Jacobite Uprising of 1745. The area had been staunch 'Jacobite' country and the government was determined to avoid any further uprisings. Roads and bridges were improved and retired goverment soldiers were housed in the village. They were supposed to guard against any future rebellions but the slow pace of life in the Highlands did not suit them. As a result they left and some of the local inhabitants were given leases to their own plots of land. The multi-arched bridge over the River Tummel dates from 1764. It was built using funds from the forfeited estates.

The illustration is from 'A Journey from Edinburgh through Parts of North Britain: containing Remarks of Scottish Landscape' by Alexander Campbell, London, 1802

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View of Kinloch Rannoch

PERTH: Fortingall

1800s

Kinloch Rannoch; Loch Rannoch; Jacobite Uprisings; Jacobite Rebellions; River Tummel

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Kinloch Rannoch village lies at the east end of Loch Rannoch in Highland Perthshire. Its roots lie in the aftermath of the Jacobite Uprising of 1745. The area had been staunch 'Jacobite' country and the government was determined to avoid any further uprisings. Roads and bridges were improved and retired goverment soldiers were housed in the village. They were supposed to guard against any future rebellions but the slow pace of life in the Highlands did not suit them. As a result they left and some of the local inhabitants were given leases to their own plots of land. The multi-arched bridge over the River Tummel dates from 1764. It was built using funds from the forfeited estates.<br /> <br /> The illustration is from 'A Journey from Edinburgh through Parts of North Britain: containing Remarks of Scottish Landscape' by Alexander Campbell, London, 1802