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TITLE
Abbot MacKinnon's Tomb, Iona
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_351A_2_P292
PLACENAME
Iona
DISTRICT
Mull
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Kilfinchen and Kilvickeon
DATE OF IMAGE
1776
PERIOD
1760s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31142
KEYWORDS
abbotts
abbeys
monasteries
cathedrals
Bishops
Abbot MacKinnon's Tomb, Iona

This illustration was taken from 'A Tour in Scotland' by Thomas Pennant. It shows Abbot John Mackinnon's tomb in Iona Abbey, last abbott of the holy isle. He died around 1500AD and was also Bishop of the Isles.

Founded by the Irish missonary, St. Columba, Iona Cathedral remained a Columban Monastery for several hundred years. However, from around 800AD, Vikings attacked the western coasts of Scotland, extending their empire as far south as the Isle of Man. Eventually, the Scandinavians embraced Christianity and Iona was incorporated into the Norse Diocese of Man and the Isles. This was ruled by the Bishop of Trondheim who was based on the Isle of Man.

The Celtic mission gradually became obsolete during the 12th century, with the coming of the Benedictines. The Abbotts ruled the lands for almost 300 years. During the 16th century, the Reformation was to disempower the Abbotts and in 1560 Iona Abbey was left derelict. It remained so until 1899, when it was handed over to the Iona Cathedral Trust

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Abbot MacKinnon's Tomb, Iona

ARGYLL: Kilfinchen and Kilvickeon

1760s

abbotts; abbeys; monasteries; cathedrals; Bishops

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This illustration was taken from 'A Tour in Scotland' by Thomas Pennant. It shows Abbot John Mackinnon's tomb in Iona Abbey, last abbott of the holy isle. He died around 1500AD and was also Bishop of the Isles.<br /> <br /> Founded by the Irish missonary, St. Columba, Iona Cathedral remained a Columban Monastery for several hundred years. However, from around 800AD, Vikings attacked the western coasts of Scotland, extending their empire as far south as the Isle of Man. Eventually, the Scandinavians embraced Christianity and Iona was incorporated into the Norse Diocese of Man and the Isles. This was ruled by the Bishop of Trondheim who was based on the Isle of Man.<br /> <br /> The Celtic mission gradually became obsolete during the 12th century, with the coming of the Benedictines. The Abbotts ruled the lands for almost 300 years. During the 16th century, the Reformation was to disempower the Abbotts and in 1560 Iona Abbey was left derelict. It remained so until 1899, when it was handed over to the Iona Cathedral Trust