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TITLE
Women at the Quern, Talisker, Isle of Skye
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_351A_2_P329
PLACENAME
Talisker
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Bracadale
DATE OF IMAGE
1776
PERIOD
1770s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31148
KEYWORDS
querns
luaghads
waulking cloth
mills
fulling mills
Talisker
Women at the Quern, Talisker, Isle of Skye

This illustration was taken from 'A Tour in Scotland' by Thomas Pennant. It shows women at the Quern (left) and the Luaghad (right), near Talisker on the Isle of Skye. A quern was a primitive grain-mill which was turned by hand. It became extinct with the introduction of the water mill. The Luaghad was similar to the fulling milll, where cloth was cleansed, shrunk and thickened by heat, moisture and pressure. Up to fourteen women, divided into two equal groups, would sit down either side of a long ribbed board.They would then place a cloth over it. Initially, the cloth is worked backwards and forwards by the women's hands and once they tire of this, they use their feet in the same manner.

Singing always accompanied both working at the quern and the luaghad.This process was known as 'waulking' and the songs as 'waulking songs'. The words often have no specific meaning but are simply syllables appropriate to the rhythm of the work

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Women at the Quern, Talisker, Isle of Skye

INVERNESS: Bracadale

1770s

querns; luaghads; waulking cloth; mills; fulling mills; Talisker

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This illustration was taken from 'A Tour in Scotland' by Thomas Pennant. It shows women at the Quern (left) and the Luaghad (right), near Talisker on the Isle of Skye. A quern was a primitive grain-mill which was turned by hand. It became extinct with the introduction of the water mill. The Luaghad was similar to the fulling milll, where cloth was cleansed, shrunk and thickened by heat, moisture and pressure. Up to fourteen women, divided into two equal groups, would sit down either side of a long ribbed board.They would then place a cloth over it. Initially, the cloth is worked backwards and forwards by the women's hands and once they tire of this, they use their feet in the same manner.<br /> <br /> Singing always accompanied both working at the quern and the luaghad.This process was known as 'waulking' and the songs as 'waulking songs'. The words often have no specific meaning but are simply syllables appropriate to the rhythm of the work