Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (12 of 23)
EXTERNAL ID
ULMAUL_VOICES_FROM_PAST_12
PLACENAME
Ullapool
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donnie MacKenzie & Mary MacKenzie
SOURCE
Ullapool Museum
ASSET ID
3115
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2
ration books
rationing

Get Adobe Flash player

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.

Mary: Now, this is one [ration book] I was issued with when I was sixteen. I can't remember what colour they were when they were issued to begin with

Donnie: They were cream coloured.

Mary: Cream colour.

Donnie, Aye, aye.

May: Well, this one was issued when I was sixteen and the interesting thing about that was, that was just at the end of the war, and if you had a blue ration book the first bananas that came into the country, each person with one of these got four bananas. And I was actually working in Inverness telephone exchange at the time and my landlady got me four bananas and I could remember what bananas were like, you see, before the war, so I just went wild and I ate the four and I have never been so ill in my life. I didn't share them with anybody. After that, of course, they became available again. So that's my ID card. What's the date on it, this one, when I was sixteen? September 1944. Well, there we are - that's an ID card, and we all had them. Now, if you wanted to go to Inverness there was a barrier across the road, at Muir of Ord, and you were stopped and soldiers came to the car or bus, or whatever you were in, and you had to produce your identity card; if you hadn't got it you had to go back home to Ullapool. And it was the same going the other way to Kyle. In fact, you had to have a special visa thing, I suppose you would call it, to have on the train going to Kyle because there was a lot of troops out in Kyle; a lot of air force boys and it was a Polish camp. I can still tell you the telephone number of it - it was Callanish 202. I remember that from my telephone exchange days.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (12 of 23)

ROSS: Lochbroom

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2; ration books; rationing

Ullapool Museum

Voices From Their Past - Ullapool

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.<br /> <br /> Mary: Now, this is one [ration book] I was issued with when I was sixteen. I can't remember what colour they were when they were issued to begin with<br /> <br /> Donnie: They were cream coloured.<br /> <br /> Mary: Cream colour.<br /> <br /> Donnie, Aye, aye.<br /> <br /> May: Well, this one was issued when I was sixteen and the interesting thing about that was, that was just at the end of the war, and if you had a blue ration book the first bananas that came into the country, each person with one of these got four bananas. And I was actually working in Inverness telephone exchange at the time and my landlady got me four bananas and I could remember what bananas were like, you see, before the war, so I just went wild and I ate the four and I have never been so ill in my life. I didn't share them with anybody. After that, of course, they became available again. So that's my ID card. What's the date on it, this one, when I was sixteen? September 1944. Well, there we are - that's an ID card, and we all had them. Now, if you wanted to go to Inverness there was a barrier across the road, at Muir of Ord, and you were stopped and soldiers came to the car or bus, or whatever you were in, and you had to produce your identity card; if you hadn't got it you had to go back home to Ullapool. And it was the same going the other way to Kyle. In fact, you had to have a special visa thing, I suppose you would call it, to have on the train going to Kyle because there was a lot of troops out in Kyle; a lot of air force boys and it was a Polish camp. I can still tell you the telephone number of it - it was Callanish 202. I remember that from my telephone exchange days.