Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Dunkeld Cathedral
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_351_P095
PLACENAME
Dunkeld
DISTRICT
Highland
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
PERTH: Dunkeld and Dowally
DATE OF IMAGE
1776
PERIOD
1760s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31160
KEYWORDS
Dunkeld
cathedrals
monasteries
St Columba
relics
buildings
Reformation
Dunkeld Cathedral

The site, on the north bank of the Tay, on which Dunkeld Cathedral stands has been Holy ground since 730AD when Culdees (Celtic missionaries) built a monastery there. In 848AD, Kenneth MacAlpin, King of the Picts and Scots, rebuilt the monastery in red stone. The relics of St Columba were moved to Dunkeld from Iona in 849AD and Dunkeld became the religious centre of Scotland.

The cathedral which stands today was built between 1260 and 1501 and is a mixture of Gothic and Norman styles. It was partially destroyed after the Reformation in 1560 and again after the Jacobite victory at the Battle of Killiecrankie in 1689.

The Choir of the building was restored during the 20th century and is used by the local Church of Scotland congregation.

This illustration was taken from 'A Tour in Scotland' by Thomas Pennant

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Dunkeld Cathedral

PERTH: Dunkeld and Dowally

1760s

Dunkeld; cathedrals; monasteries; St Columba; relics; buildings; Reformation

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The site, on the north bank of the Tay, on which Dunkeld Cathedral stands has been Holy ground since 730AD when Culdees (Celtic missionaries) built a monastery there. In 848AD, Kenneth MacAlpin, King of the Picts and Scots, rebuilt the monastery in red stone. The relics of St Columba were moved to Dunkeld from Iona in 849AD and Dunkeld became the religious centre of Scotland.<br /> <br /> The cathedral which stands today was built between 1260 and 1501 and is a mixture of Gothic and Norman styles. It was partially destroyed after the Reformation in 1560 and again after the Jacobite victory at the Battle of Killiecrankie in 1689. <br /> <br /> The Choir of the building was restored during the 20th century and is used by the local Church of Scotland congregation.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'A Tour in Scotland' by Thomas Pennant