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TITLE
Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (14 of 23)
EXTERNAL ID
ULMAUL_VOICES_FROM_PAST_14
PLACENAME
Ullapool
DISTRICT
Lochbroom
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochbroom
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donnie MacKenzie & Mary MacKenzie
SOURCE
Ullapool Museum
ASSET ID
3118
KEYWORDS
audios
Second World War
World War 2
Burma Campaign
Burmese Campaign
Chindit
Chindits
Slim's Forgottern Army

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This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.

Interviewer: Did you get any injuries?

Donnie: No, ma dear. I didn't have injuries. I didn't, no. I didn't get any, and I was immune to malaria - I was a carrier of it - but I wouldn't, it wouldn't show on myself. But I could - if a mosquito bit me and then bit, bites you, it would pass the germ on to you, like, but it never showed on me. I was a carrier, but it never showed on me. The nearest the Japanese got to wounding me was a bullet went straight through my hat! [Laughter]. Yeh. We were ambushed in the middle of a river - the Salween River it's called, in Burma - and we were ambushed in the middle of it, and I couldn't swim, I still can't swim, but I got across the river by hanging onto the mule's tail, and was scrambling up the embankment on the other side when we were snipe - the snipers got us - you know? And this bullets was flying everywhere and one bullet went right through my hat! [Laughter]. I took the bullet - the hat home with me but I don't know what happened to it after that.

Interviewer: Did you have a cloth hat or a hard hat?

Donnie: Eh, d'you know what a cowboy hat looks like? I'll show you - I think I've got a photo here. That's the hat we wore. That's [?]

Interviewer: Oh, right.

Donnie. We weren't allowed to carry steel helmets because of the extra weight it was putting on us. Our total weight to carry was half a hundredweight. We had to carry that on our backs all the time. That was mostly ammunition; grenades, and our belts here, with grenades on them as well. The maximum, the maximum we could carry in our rucksacks was just, just over the half hundredweight. Now, a half hundredweight means nothing to you, does it? You don't know what a half hundredweight is.

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Ullapool - Voices From Their Past (14 of 23)

ROSS: Lochbroom

2000s

audios; Second World War; World War 2; Burma Campaign; Burmese Campaign; Chindit; Chindits; Slim's Forgottern Army

Ullapool Museum

Voices From Their Past - Ullapool

This audio recording is part of a World War II project carried out by Ullapool Museum and Ullapool Primary School. 'Voices From Their Past - Messages For Your Future' was recorded in 2005. The interviewees - Mary and Donnie MacKenzie - are being interviewed by children of Ullapool Primary School.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you get any injuries?<br /> <br /> Donnie: No, ma dear. I didn't have injuries. I didn't, no. I didn't get any, and I was immune to malaria - I was a carrier of it - but I wouldn't, it wouldn't show on myself. But I could - if a mosquito bit me and then bit, bites you, it would pass the germ on to you, like, but it never showed on me. I was a carrier, but it never showed on me. The nearest the Japanese got to wounding me was a bullet went straight through my hat! [Laughter]. Yeh. We were ambushed in the middle of a river - the Salween River it's called, in Burma - and we were ambushed in the middle of it, and I couldn't swim, I still can't swim, but I got across the river by hanging onto the mule's tail, and was scrambling up the embankment on the other side when we were snipe - the snipers got us - you know? And this bullets was flying everywhere and one bullet went right through my hat! [Laughter]. I took the bullet - the hat home with me but I don't know what happened to it after that.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you have a cloth hat or a hard hat?<br /> <br /> Donnie: Eh, d'you know what a cowboy hat looks like? I'll show you - I think I've got a photo here. That's the hat we wore. That's [?]<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh, right.<br /> <br /> Donnie. We weren't allowed to carry steel helmets because of the extra weight it was putting on us. Our total weight to carry was half a hundredweight. We had to carry that on our backs all the time. That was mostly ammunition; grenades, and our belts here, with grenades on them as well. The maximum, the maximum we could carry in our rucksacks was just, just over the half hundredweight. Now, a half hundredweight means nothing to you, does it? You don't know what a half hundredweight is.