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TITLE
Shandwick Stone
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_352_FM_P003
PLACENAME
Shandwick
DISTRICT
Fearn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Nigg
DATE OF IMAGE
1780
PERIOD
1780s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31180
KEYWORDS
crosses
cross slabs
Picts
Pictish stones
carvings
designs
decorations
symbols
Shandwick Stone

The Pictish stone at Shandwick, also known as Clach a' Charridh, stands over 100ft (30m) high. It is located on a hilltop overlooking the village of Shandwick, near Tain.

One side of the stone is decorated with an elaborate cross design. The other is separated into five panels. These include an impressive hunting scene and a complex pattern of serpents trying to bite their own bodies, similar to 8th century metal work from Britain and Europe. The top panel includes a double disc symbol over a Pictish beast.

The stone is a Class II Pictish stone which means that it is carved in relief with a cross on one side and recognisable Pictish designs on the other. Class II stones were carved during the 8th and 9th centuries. The Shandwick stone blew down in a gale in 1846 but was restored and is now housed in a glass case in its original position on the hill.

This illustration was taken from 'Antiquities and Scenery of the North of Scotland, in a series of letters to Thomas Pennant Esq', by Rev Charles Cordiner, Minister of St Andrew's Chapel, Banff (1780)

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Shandwick Stone

ROSS: Nigg

1780s

crosses; cross slabs; Picts; Pictish stones; carvings; designs; decorations; symbols

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The Pictish stone at Shandwick, also known as Clach a' Charridh, stands over 100ft (30m) high. It is located on a hilltop overlooking the village of Shandwick, near Tain.<br /> <br /> One side of the stone is decorated with an elaborate cross design. The other is separated into five panels. These include an impressive hunting scene and a complex pattern of serpents trying to bite their own bodies, similar to 8th century metal work from Britain and Europe. The top panel includes a double disc symbol over a Pictish beast. <br /> <br /> The stone is a Class II Pictish stone which means that it is carved in relief with a cross on one side and recognisable Pictish designs on the other. Class II stones were carved during the 8th and 9th centuries. The Shandwick stone blew down in a gale in 1846 but was restored and is now housed in a glass case in its original position on the hill. <br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Antiquities and Scenery of the North of Scotland, in a series of letters to Thomas Pennant Esq', by Rev Charles Cordiner, Minister of St Andrew's Chapel, Banff (1780)