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TITLE
Castle of Old Wick
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_352_FM_P007
PLACENAME
Castle of Old Wick
DISTRICT
Eastern
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
DATE OF IMAGE
1780
PERIOD
1780s
CREATOR
C Cordiner
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31184
KEYWORDS
castles
buildings
earls
towers
Norse
Castle of Old Wick

The Castle of Old Wick stands on a cliff about a mile south of Wick. The castle was a four-storey tower built in the late 12th- to early 13th century when Caithness was ruled by the Norse Earls of Orkney. It is one of the oldest surviving stone castles in Scotland. The castle had no fireplaces and was probably lit by braziers. There were no internal staircases and ladders were used instead.

The castle was first owned by Harald Maddadson, Earl of Caithness, and in its lifetime it passed through the hands of Sir Reginald de Cheyne, Lord Duffus, the Oliphants, the Sinclairs, the Campbells, and finally the Dunbars. The castle was probably in ruins by the 1670s.

This illustration was taken from 'Antiquities and Scenery of the North of Scotland, in a series of letters to Thomas Pennant Esq', by Rev Charles Cordiner, Minister of St Andrew's Chapel, Banff (1780)

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Castle of Old Wick

CAITHNESS: Wick

1780s

castles; buildings; earls; towers; Norse

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The Castle of Old Wick stands on a cliff about a mile south of Wick. The castle was a four-storey tower built in the late 12th- to early 13th century when Caithness was ruled by the Norse Earls of Orkney. It is one of the oldest surviving stone castles in Scotland. The castle had no fireplaces and was probably lit by braziers. There were no internal staircases and ladders were used instead.<br /> <br /> The castle was first owned by Harald Maddadson, Earl of Caithness, and in its lifetime it passed through the hands of Sir Reginald de Cheyne, Lord Duffus, the Oliphants, the Sinclairs, the Campbells, and finally the Dunbars. The castle was probably in ruins by the 1670s.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Antiquities and Scenery of the North of Scotland, in a series of letters to Thomas Pennant Esq', by Rev Charles Cordiner, Minister of St Andrew's Chapel, Banff (1780)