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TITLE
Dun Dornadilla
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_352_FM_P010
PLACENAME
Dun Dornadilla / Dun Dornaigil
DISTRICT
Eddrachillis and Durness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Durness
DATE OF IMAGE
1780
PERIOD
1780s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31187
KEYWORDS
Dun Dornaigil
duns
brochs
buildings
Iron Age
archaeology
stones
Dun Dornadilla

Dun Dornadilla, also known as Dun Dornaigil, is a ruined broch which stands above the Strathmore River approximately 10 miles south of Hope. It was built about 2,000 years ago. In general the ruins are approximately 2-3m high but at their highest point they rise to almost 7m (23ft). Originally there would have been two walls with a staircase within leading to the upper galleries. Now only the outer wall survives, supported by a modern buttress.

One of the most interesting points in the broch is the massive triangular lintel over the entrance which is now blocked by the fallen stonework.

The broch is looked after by Historic Scotland.

This illustration was taken from 'Antiquities and Scenery of the North of Scotland, in a series of letters to Thomas Pennant Esq', by Rev Charles Cordiner, Minister of St Andrew's Chapel, Banff (1780)

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Dun Dornadilla

SUTHERLAND: Durness

1780s

Dun Dornaigil; duns; brochs; buildings; Iron Age; archaeology; stones

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Dun Dornadilla, also known as Dun Dornaigil, is a ruined broch which stands above the Strathmore River approximately 10 miles south of Hope. It was built about 2,000 years ago. In general the ruins are approximately 2-3m high but at their highest point they rise to almost 7m (23ft). Originally there would have been two walls with a staircase within leading to the upper galleries. Now only the outer wall survives, supported by a modern buttress. <br /> <br /> One of the most interesting points in the broch is the massive triangular lintel over the entrance which is now blocked by the fallen stonework.<br /> <br /> The broch is looked after by Historic Scotland.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Antiquities and Scenery of the North of Scotland, in a series of letters to Thomas Pennant Esq', by Rev Charles Cordiner, Minister of St Andrew's Chapel, Banff (1780)