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TITLE
Castle Stalker
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_407_P096
PLACENAME
Castle Stalker
DISTRICT
North Lorn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Lismore and Appin
DATE OF IMAGE
1887
PERIOD
1760s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31204
KEYWORDS
Castle Stalker
Castle Stalker

This illustration of Castle Stalker is from 'Tours in Scotland 1747, 1750, 1760' by Richard Pococke, Bishop of Meath, published by the Scottish History Society, 1887. (Pococke has used the phonetic spelling 'Tene Stalcar' from the Gaelic 'Tigh na Stalcaire').

This ancient castle is built on a rock in Loch Linnhe in Argyll. The ruins that can be seen today date from around 1540 but the rock has been occupied since about 1320. The three-storey tower house was probably built by Duncan Stewart of Appin as a hunting lodge for James IV. It was used as a garrison during the 1745 uprising and after the Battle of Culloden, the Government forces used it as a centre for clansmen to surrender their arms.

It has been fully restored in the 20th century and can now be visited by the public

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Castle Stalker

ARGYLL: Lismore and Appin

1760s

Castle Stalker

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This illustration of Castle Stalker is from 'Tours in Scotland 1747, 1750, 1760' by Richard Pococke, Bishop of Meath, published by the Scottish History Society, 1887. (Pococke has used the phonetic spelling 'Tene Stalcar' from the Gaelic 'Tigh na Stalcaire').<br /> <br /> This ancient castle is built on a rock in Loch Linnhe in Argyll. The ruins that can be seen today date from around 1540 but the rock has been occupied since about 1320. The three-storey tower house was probably built by Duncan Stewart of Appin as a hunting lodge for James IV. It was used as a garrison during the 1745 uprising and after the Battle of Culloden, the Government forces used it as a centre for clansmen to surrender their arms.<br /> <br /> It has been fully restored in the 20th century and can now be visited by the public