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TITLE
Urquhart Castle
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_407_P102
PLACENAME
Drumnadrochit
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
DATE OF IMAGE
1887
PERIOD
1760s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31205
KEYWORDS
Robert the Bruce
Urquhart Castle

This illustration of Urquhart Castle is from 'Tours in Scotland 1747, 1750, 1760' by Richard Pococke, Bishop of Meath, published by the Scottish History Society, 1887.

Urquhart Castle stands on a rocky promentary, commanding extensive views of Loch Ness. It dates from the 12th century when a Norman motte and bailey occupied the site. It passed into the hands of the Comyns of Badenoch in the 13th century and was occupied by Edward I's troops in 1296 and 1303. Robert I regained the castle and by the end of the 14th century it was designated a royal castle. It became the scene of many conflicts between the Kings of Scotland and the Lords of the Isles. It was finally abandoned in the 17th century and fell into decay. In the 20th century it was taken over by Historic Scotland. Today the castle is visited by thousands of tourists. A new visitor centre was opened in November 2001

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Urquhart Castle

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1760s

Robert the Bruce

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This illustration of Urquhart Castle is from 'Tours in Scotland 1747, 1750, 1760' by Richard Pococke, Bishop of Meath, published by the Scottish History Society, 1887.<br /> <br /> Urquhart Castle stands on a rocky promentary, commanding extensive views of Loch Ness. It dates from the 12th century when a Norman motte and bailey occupied the site. It passed into the hands of the Comyns of Badenoch in the 13th century and was occupied by Edward I's troops in 1296 and 1303. Robert I regained the castle and by the end of the 14th century it was designated a royal castle. It became the scene of many conflicts between the Kings of Scotland and the Lords of the Isles. It was finally abandoned in the 17th century and fell into decay. In the 20th century it was taken over by Historic Scotland. Today the castle is visited by thousands of tourists. A new visitor centre was opened in November 2001