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TITLE
Broch of Dun Dornaigil, also known as Dun Dornadilla, Sutherland
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_407_P122
PLACENAME
Dun Dornadilla / Dun Dornaigil
DISTRICT
Eddrachillis and Durness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Durness
DATE OF IMAGE
1887
PERIOD
1760s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31207
KEYWORDS
Dun Dornadilla
Broch of Dun Dornaigil, also known as Dun Dornadilla, Sutherland

This illustration of Dun Dornaigil is from 'Tours in Scotland 1747, 1750, 1760' by Richard Pococke, Bishop of Meath, published by the Scottish History Society, 1887.

Dun Dornaigil (also known as Dun Dornadilla) is a 2000-year-old broch situated above the Strathmore River in Sutherland. The illustration shows the outside view of the broch.

Brochs were widespread throughout northern and western Scotland at this time. They may have built to protect the local population in times of threat. They were constructed with two concentric stone walls bonded by rows of slabs which formed galleries. Steps within the walls allowed access to various levels. Today Dun Dornaigil is in the care of Historic Scotland

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Broch of Dun Dornaigil, also known as Dun Dornadilla, Sutherland

SUTHERLAND: Durness

1760s

Dun Dornadilla

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This illustration of Dun Dornaigil is from 'Tours in Scotland 1747, 1750, 1760' by Richard Pococke, Bishop of Meath, published by the Scottish History Society, 1887.<br /> <br /> Dun Dornaigil (also known as Dun Dornadilla) is a 2000-year-old broch situated above the Strathmore River in Sutherland. The illustration shows the outside view of the broch. <br /> <br /> Brochs were widespread throughout northern and western Scotland at this time. They may have built to protect the local population in times of threat. They were constructed with two concentric stone walls bonded by rows of slabs which formed galleries. Steps within the walls allowed access to various levels. Today Dun Dornaigil is in the care of Historic Scotland