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TITLE
General Monck's Campaign in the Highlands, 1654
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_430_P003
PLACENAME
Central Highlands
PERIOD
1650s
SOURCE
Highland Archive Centre
ASSET ID
31214
KEYWORDS
Monk
forts
garrisons
Covenant
Protectorate
Oliver Cromwell
zoomable

This map shows the routes taken by Cromwell's army, under the command of General George Monck and Major-General Thomas Morgan, against the Royalist forces loyal to Charles II.

George Monck, or Monk, (1608-1670) enjoyed a distinguished military career and fought on both sides during the Civil War - for Charles I against the Covenanters in Scotland and the Confederates in Ireland, and as commander of the Parliament's forces in Ulster and Command-in-Chief for Cromwell in Scotland.

He began a second spell as Command-in-Chief in Scotland in April 1654 to tackle Lord Middleton, Charles II commander in the Highlands, who had 8000 soldiers at his command. Monck set-up headquarters at Dalkeith and, after receiving reinforcements of soldiers, ships and money, launched his offensive in June. He divided his army into two columns, one led by himself, the other under the command of Major-General Thomas Morgan. His column drove the enemy back to Loch Garry where Morgan awaited them. Middleton was defeated and subsequently unable to gather a force of more than a few hundred men.

Monck and Morgan systematically devastated the Highlands, burning many townships, imposing fines on fathers who let their sons fight and offering rewards for the capture of Royalist leaders. He also established a spying network which prevented his enemies from rallying or uniting. He also completed the building of fortresses at Inverlochy, Inverness, Ayr, Perth and Leith, which enabled him to maintain the peace.

Following Cromwell's death he switched his support to King Charles II (1630-85) and his regiment was later renamed the Coldstream Guards. After his restoration to the throne, Charles made Monck the Duke of Albemarle. He is buried in Westminster Abbey.


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General Monck's Campaign in the Highlands, 1654

1650s

Monk; forts; garrisons; Covenant; Protectorate; Oliver Cromwell; zoomable

Highland Archive Centre

This map shows the routes taken by Cromwell's army, under the command of General George Monck and Major-General Thomas Morgan, against the Royalist forces loyal to Charles II.<br /> <br /> George Monck, or Monk, (1608-1670) enjoyed a distinguished military career and fought on both sides during the Civil War - for Charles I against the Covenanters in Scotland and the Confederates in Ireland, and as commander of the Parliament's forces in Ulster and Command-in-Chief for Cromwell in Scotland.<br /> <br /> He began a second spell as Command-in-Chief in Scotland in April 1654 to tackle Lord Middleton, Charles II commander in the Highlands, who had 8000 soldiers at his command. Monck set-up headquarters at Dalkeith and, after receiving reinforcements of soldiers, ships and money, launched his offensive in June. He divided his army into two columns, one led by himself, the other under the command of Major-General Thomas Morgan. His column drove the enemy back to Loch Garry where Morgan awaited them. Middleton was defeated and subsequently unable to gather a force of more than a few hundred men. <br /> <br /> Monck and Morgan systematically devastated the Highlands, burning many townships, imposing fines on fathers who let their sons fight and offering rewards for the capture of Royalist leaders. He also established a spying network which prevented his enemies from rallying or uniting. He also completed the building of fortresses at Inverlochy, Inverness, Ayr, Perth and Leith, which enabled him to maintain the peace. <br /> <br /> Following Cromwell's death he switched his support to King Charles II (1630-85) and his regiment was later renamed the Coldstream Guards. After his restoration to the throne, Charles made Monck the Duke of Albemarle. He is buried in Westminster Abbey. <br /> <br /> <br /> For further information about this item and the collection to which it belongs, please <a href="mailto: archives@highlifehighland.com">email</a> the Highland Archive Service