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TITLE
Duart Castle, Mull
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_468_P055
PLACENAME
Duart Castle
DISTRICT
Mull
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Torosay
DATE OF IMAGE
1902
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31271
KEYWORDS
castles
Duart Castle, Mull

This illustration was taken from "Argyll's Highlands" by Cuthbert Bede. It shows a photograph of the 13th-century fortress, Duart Castle, home of the Clan Maclean for over 400 years. Situated on a clifftop known as 'Dubh Ard', it overlooks the Sound of Mull.

The oldest part of the castle is the courtyard, built during the 13th century by the Clan Maclean. The family were loyal supporters of the Jacobite cause, both in 1715 and 1745, but this cost them dearly when the castle was later garrisoned by the Government troops. After the army's departure in 1756, the fortress was burned. It remained a ruin until 1911, when Sir Fitzroy Maclean restored it. The castle is open to visitors but still remains the home of the 28th Chief, Sir Lachlan Maclean

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Duart Castle, Mull

ARGYLL: Torosay

castles

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (photographs)

This illustration was taken from "Argyll's Highlands" by Cuthbert Bede. It shows a photograph of the 13th-century fortress, Duart Castle, home of the Clan Maclean for over 400 years. Situated on a clifftop known as 'Dubh Ard', it overlooks the Sound of Mull. <br /> <br /> The oldest part of the castle is the courtyard, built during the 13th century by the Clan Maclean. The family were loyal supporters of the Jacobite cause, both in 1715 and 1745, but this cost them dearly when the castle was later garrisoned by the Government troops. After the army's departure in 1756, the fortress was burned. It remained a ruin until 1911, when Sir Fitzroy Maclean restored it. The castle is open to visitors but still remains the home of the 28th Chief, Sir Lachlan Maclean