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TITLE
Strathpeffer
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_784_P013
PLACENAME
Strathpeffer
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Fodderty
DATE OF IMAGE
1893
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
F Valentine and Sons
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31325
KEYWORDS
spas
springs
waters
towns
buildings
tourism
First World War
World War I
Strathpeffer

Strathpeffer lies 4 miles west of Dingwall in Strath Peffer. In the late 18th century the sulphur and iron-rich springs were declared to have healing powers and a steady stream of visitors came to the town. The railway arrived in 1885 and from then until the First World War the town was a major visitor attraction.

Most of the buildings in the town are built from the same grey metamorphic stone and the Victorian layout of the buildings has ensured that there are many green spaces. By retaining all the Victorian buildings the town has remained a popular destination for coach and bus tours.

Strathpeffer is also the home of a Pictish stone known as the Eagle Stone. A prophesy of the Brahan Seer claims that if the stone falls over three times then ships will anchor on the spot. The stone is now cemented into the ground.

This illustration was taken from 'Mackenzie's Guide to Inverness', by Alexander Mackenzie (Inverness, 1893)

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Strathpeffer

ROSS: Fodderty

1890s

spas; springs; waters; towns; buildings; tourism; First World War; World War I

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Strathpeffer lies 4 miles west of Dingwall in Strath Peffer. In the late 18th century the sulphur and iron-rich springs were declared to have healing powers and a steady stream of visitors came to the town. The railway arrived in 1885 and from then until the First World War the town was a major visitor attraction.<br /> <br /> Most of the buildings in the town are built from the same grey metamorphic stone and the Victorian layout of the buildings has ensured that there are many green spaces. By retaining all the Victorian buildings the town has remained a popular destination for coach and bus tours.<br /> <br /> Strathpeffer is also the home of a Pictish stone known as the Eagle Stone. A prophesy of the Brahan Seer claims that if the stone falls over three times then ships will anchor on the spot. The stone is now cemented into the ground.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Mackenzie's Guide to Inverness', by Alexander Mackenzie (Inverness, 1893)