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TITLE
Johnson and Boswell's Journey to Raasay
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_914_117_P010
PLACENAME
Raasay
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
DATE OF IMAGE
1852
PERIOD
1770s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31352
KEYWORDS
islands
boats
journeys
animals
poets
roads
building
engineering
Johnson and Boswell's Journey to Raasay

The island of Raasay lies to the east of Skye, between it and the Applecross peninsula. The island is almost 15 miles long and covers an area of just under 16,000 acres. The highest point of the island is Dun Caan which stands at 1453ft (443m).

Raasay has a variety of wildlife including deer, otters and Golden Eagles. The island also has a species of vole which is unique to Raasay.

The Gaelic poet Sorley Maclean was born on Raasay in 1911.

In the 1970s, after waiting many years for an access road to Arnish from the main road two miles away to be built, Calum Macleod decided to build the road himself. He did so over a period of 10-15 years. The road is still called Calum's road although Calum died not long after its completion.

This illustration was taken from 'Boswell's Journal of the Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson' (1852 edition)

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Johnson and Boswell's Journey to Raasay

INVERNESS: Portree

1770s

islands; boats; journeys; animals; poets; roads; building; engineering

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The island of Raasay lies to the east of Skye, between it and the Applecross peninsula. The island is almost 15 miles long and covers an area of just under 16,000 acres. The highest point of the island is Dun Caan which stands at 1453ft (443m).<br /> <br /> Raasay has a variety of wildlife including deer, otters and Golden Eagles. The island also has a species of vole which is unique to Raasay.<br /> <br /> The Gaelic poet Sorley Maclean was born on Raasay in 1911.<br /> <br /> In the 1970s, after waiting many years for an access road to Arnish from the main road two miles away to be built, Calum Macleod decided to build the road himself. He did so over a period of 10-15 years. The road is still called Calum's road although Calum died not long after its completion.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Boswell's Journal of the Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson' (1852 edition)