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TITLE
St Kilda
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_914_117_P012
PLACENAME
St Kilda
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Harris
DATE OF IMAGE
1852
PERIOD
1770s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31354
KEYWORDS
islands
seabirds
birds
NTS
SNH
MoD
St Kilda

St Kilda is an archipelago approximately 40 miles off the west coast of Benbecula. The islands are Hirta (the main island), Dun, Soay and Boreray. The islands have been almost continuously occupied for the last 2000 years.

St Kilda's population was self-sufficient, relying on seabirds and basic agriculture. During the 19th century a growth in the number of visitors to the islands began a gradual loss of self-sufficiency. During the First World War a naval detachment on Hirta saw regular deliveries of mail and food. When the war ended and this service was stopped morale on the island fell. In 1930 the islanders requested evacuation to the mainland.

In 1957 St Kilda was left to the National Trust for Scotland by the 5th Marquis of Bute. It is now managed by Scottish Natural Heritage. The human population of St Kilda is now confined to a few military personnel to man the Ministry of Defence radar station, a ranger and visiting scientists and conservation workers. The island's bird populations are much larger. St Kilda houses the world's largest gannet population, Britain's largest fulmar population, and half of Britain's puffins.

This illustration was taken from 'Boswell's Journal of the Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson' (1852 edition)

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St Kilda

INVERNESS: Harris

1770s

islands; seabirds; birds; NTS; SNH; MoD

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

St Kilda is an archipelago approximately 40 miles off the west coast of Benbecula. The islands are Hirta (the main island), Dun, Soay and Boreray. The islands have been almost continuously occupied for the last 2000 years. <br /> <br /> St Kilda's population was self-sufficient, relying on seabirds and basic agriculture. During the 19th century a growth in the number of visitors to the islands began a gradual loss of self-sufficiency. During the First World War a naval detachment on Hirta saw regular deliveries of mail and food. When the war ended and this service was stopped morale on the island fell. In 1930 the islanders requested evacuation to the mainland.<br /> <br /> In 1957 St Kilda was left to the National Trust for Scotland by the 5th Marquis of Bute. It is now managed by Scottish Natural Heritage. The human population of St Kilda is now confined to a few military personnel to man the Ministry of Defence radar station, a ranger and visiting scientists and conservation workers. The island's bird populations are much larger. St Kilda houses the world's largest gannet population, Britain's largest fulmar population, and half of Britain's puffins. <br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Boswell's Journal of the Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson' (1852 edition)