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TITLE
The Stones of Calanais
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_914_203_P001
PLACENAME
Calanais
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Uig
DATE OF IMAGE
1880
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31363
KEYWORDS
stones
standing stones
Callanish
Callenish
archaeology
The Stones of Calanais

The standing stones of Calanais stand on the east side of Loch Roag on Lewis. There are over 20 different monuments on the site, erected between 3000 and 4000 years ago.

The most famous is known as Calanais I and is made up of around 50 stones. At the heart of the monument is a circle of 13 stones surrounding the tallest stone, which is 16ft high and weighs over 5 tonnes. Extending north from the circle is a double row of stones creating an avenue. Three single rows of stones extend to the east, west and south from the centre circle. It is thought that the lines represent significant points in the lunar cycle. The site probably lost its significance to those who built it around 800BC and peat grew over it. In 1857 around 6ft of peat was cleared to reveal the stones again.

This illustration is taken from the book 'Our Ancient Monuments and the Land Around Them', by Charles Philip Kains-Jackson (1880)

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The Stones of Calanais

ROSS: Uig

stones; standing stones; Callanish; Callenish; archaeology

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The standing stones of Calanais stand on the east side of Loch Roag on Lewis. There are over 20 different monuments on the site, erected between 3000 and 4000 years ago.<br /> <br /> The most famous is known as Calanais I and is made up of around 50 stones. At the heart of the monument is a circle of 13 stones surrounding the tallest stone, which is 16ft high and weighs over 5 tonnes. Extending north from the circle is a double row of stones creating an avenue. Three single rows of stones extend to the east, west and south from the centre circle. It is thought that the lines represent significant points in the lunar cycle. The site probably lost its significance to those who built it around 800BC and peat grew over it. In 1857 around 6ft of peat was cleared to reveal the stones again.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from the book 'Our Ancient Monuments and the Land Around Them', by Charles Philip Kains-Jackson (1880)