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TITLE
Interview with Major-General Robertson about the Normandy invasion
EXTERNAL ID
WD_BF01_TRACK08_ROBERTSON_02
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Major-General Robertson
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3142
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
Armed Forces
Normandy landings
battles
audio

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Major-General Robertson talks about the Normandy invasion of 1944.

I think the most important, I think the most important time, what I felt was the most important time, was when we actually landed in Normandy. When we got out of our boats and we walked across the beaches and we felt that the moment had come when it was the beginning of the end of the war, we were going to, we were going to win. I think that was the most important time. It was, I landed one hour after the first troops on D-Day and the first troops had had quite a lot of casualties and the beach was covered with wounded people. And they all looked strange, weird, because they all had green camouflaged faces, and they were lying in funny positions as wounded people and dead people do. And once one got through that and you saw the tanks coming up behind you, wading through the water, and hundreds and hundreds of other boats lying off the shore, ready to put their soldiers onto the shore, you felt that really this was a very important time in the war - the most important time, I think.

I had a brother who had also been a Seaforth but he'd left the Seaforths and he'd gone into an organisation called MI5, and it dealt with spies. And his job - which worked out quite successfully in the end - was to get German spies who came over to this country to find out what we were doing and persuade them that they were on the wrong side, that they ought to join us. And he had to persuade them to send messages, by radio, back to the Germans, giving them false information about what we were doing. And, as a result of that, the Germans came to believe that when we landed in Normandy, we weren't going to land there at all. We were going to land further up the coast, at the Pas-de-Calais, and so they concentrated their armour up there and we were able to get in on the Normandy landings. And that was really just a result of the information we sent back from German spies who joined our side to the enemy. And that fooled Hitler and helped us get ashore.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.

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Interview with Major-General Robertson about the Normandy invasion

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; Armed Forces; Normandy landings; battles; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Major-General Robertson talks about the Normandy invasion of 1944.<br /> <br /> I think the most important, I think the most important time, what I felt was the most important time, was when we actually landed in Normandy. When we got out of our boats and we walked across the beaches and we felt that the moment had come when it was the beginning of the end of the war, we were going to, we were going to win. I think that was the most important time. It was, I landed one hour after the first troops on D-Day and the first troops had had quite a lot of casualties and the beach was covered with wounded people. And they all looked strange, weird, because they all had green camouflaged faces, and they were lying in funny positions as wounded people and dead people do. And once one got through that and you saw the tanks coming up behind you, wading through the water, and hundreds and hundreds of other boats lying off the shore, ready to put their soldiers onto the shore, you felt that really this was a very important time in the war - the most important time, I think. <br /> <br /> I had a brother who had also been a Seaforth but he'd left the Seaforths and he'd gone into an organisation called MI5, and it dealt with spies. And his job - which worked out quite successfully in the end - was to get German spies who came over to this country to find out what we were doing and persuade them that they were on the wrong side, that they ought to join us. And he had to persuade them to send messages, by radio, back to the Germans, giving them false information about what we were doing. And, as a result of that, the Germans came to believe that when we landed in Normandy, we weren't going to land there at all. We were going to land further up the coast, at the Pas-de-Calais, and so they concentrated their armour up there and we were able to get in on the Normandy landings. And that was really just a result of the information we sent back from German spies who joined our side to the enemy. And that fooled Hitler and helped us get ashore. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.