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TITLE
Loch Awe and Kilchurn Castle from the Gooses Rock
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1103_P002
PLACENAME
Loch Awe
DISTRICT
South Lorn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Glenorchy and Inishail
PERIOD
1830s
CREATOR
John Fleming
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31420
KEYWORDS
lochs
castles
hills
mountains
peninsulas
islands
Loch Awe and Kilchurn Castle from the Gooses Rock

Loch Awe lies south east of Oban and, at almost 24 miles (38km) in length, is the longest freshwater loch in Scotland. It is very narrow, being in most places no more than a mile wide. This illustration shows a view from the Goose's Rock (Creag-a-Gheoidh) at the base of Beinn a'Bhuiridh, part of the great Ben Cruachan.

In the past, Loch Awe acted as a natural barrier to protect the Campbells of Inveraray from their enemies to the north. The ruins of Inishail Chapel, Finharn Castle and Kilchurn Castle, as well as many ancient crannogs, can be found there. Loch Awe is also famous for its wild brown trout.

Kilchurn Castle stands on a small peninsula, once an island, in Loch Awe, about a mile west of Dalmally. The castle dates from the 15th century and was built by Colin Campbell, the First Lord of Glenorchy. In 1681 Sir John Campbell of Glenorchy was made the First Earl of Breadalbane and in the 1690s he converted the castle into a barracks capable of housing up to 200 troops.

The castle was used as a government barracks during the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite risings but despite the Campbells' efforts, the government would not buy the castle from them. The Campbells left Kilchurn Castle for Taymouth Castle and their Perthshire estates in 1740. In 1760, lightning so badly damaged the castle that it was abandoned and left to ruin. Since the 1950s it has been in the care of Historic Scotland.

This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.

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Loch Awe and Kilchurn Castle from the Gooses Rock

ARGYLL: Glenorchy and Inishail

1830s

lochs; castles; hills; mountains; peninsulas; islands

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Loch Awe lies south east of Oban and, at almost 24 miles (38km) in length, is the longest freshwater loch in Scotland. It is very narrow, being in most places no more than a mile wide. This illustration shows a view from the Goose's Rock (Creag-a-Gheoidh) at the base of Beinn a'Bhuiridh, part of the great Ben Cruachan.<br /> <br /> In the past, Loch Awe acted as a natural barrier to protect the Campbells of Inveraray from their enemies to the north. The ruins of Inishail Chapel, Finharn Castle and Kilchurn Castle, as well as many ancient crannogs, can be found there. Loch Awe is also famous for its wild brown trout. <br /> <br /> Kilchurn Castle stands on a small peninsula, once an island, in Loch Awe, about a mile west of Dalmally. The castle dates from the 15th century and was built by Colin Campbell, the First Lord of Glenorchy. In 1681 Sir John Campbell of Glenorchy was made the First Earl of Breadalbane and in the 1690s he converted the castle into a barracks capable of housing up to 200 troops. <br /> <br /> The castle was used as a government barracks during the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite risings but despite the Campbells' efforts, the government would not buy the castle from them. The Campbells left Kilchurn Castle for Taymouth Castle and their Perthshire estates in 1740. In 1760, lightning so badly damaged the castle that it was abandoned and left to ruin. Since the 1950s it has been in the care of Historic Scotland.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.