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TITLE
Loch Awe from above Cladich looking north
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1103_P003
PLACENAME
Loch Awe
DISTRICT
South Lorn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Glenorchy and Inishail
PERIOD
1830s
CREATOR
John Fleming
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31421
KEYWORDS
lochs
villages
rivers
islands
isles
woods
chapels
burial grounds
promontories
castles
Loch Awe from above Cladich looking north

Loch Awe lies south east of Oban and, at almost 24 miles (38km) in length, is the longest freshwater loch in Scotland. It is very narrow, being in most places no more than a mile wide. This illustration shows a view of the loch from above the village of Cladich, part of which can be seen in the foreground. Cladich is a scattered settlement about five miles southwest of Dalmally. It lies beside the Cladich River which joins the Archan River before flowing into Loch Awe.

The wooded island nearest to the spectator is Innis Dubh (Black Island) and beyond it is a long heathy island called Inishail (Fair Island), where the remains of a chapel and an ancient burial ground can be found. Further up the loch is Fraoch Eilean (Heather Isle), where the MacNaughtons once had a stronghold. The promontory jutting out into the lake immediately beyond Cladich is known as Inistrynich (Island of the Druids).

In the past, Loch Awe acted as a natural barrier to protect the Campbells of Inveraray from their enemies to the north. The ruins of Finharn Castle and Kilchurn Castle, as well as many ancient crannogs, can be found there. Loch Awe is also famous for its wild brown trout.

This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.

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Loch Awe from above Cladich looking north

ARGYLL: Glenorchy and Inishail

1830s

lochs; villages; rivers; islands; isles; woods; chapels; burial grounds; promontories; castles

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Loch Awe lies south east of Oban and, at almost 24 miles (38km) in length, is the longest freshwater loch in Scotland. It is very narrow, being in most places no more than a mile wide. This illustration shows a view of the loch from above the village of Cladich, part of which can be seen in the foreground. Cladich is a scattered settlement about five miles southwest of Dalmally. It lies beside the Cladich River which joins the Archan River before flowing into Loch Awe.<br /> <br /> The wooded island nearest to the spectator is Innis Dubh (Black Island) and beyond it is a long heathy island called Inishail (Fair Island), where the remains of a chapel and an ancient burial ground can be found. Further up the loch is Fraoch Eilean (Heather Isle), where the MacNaughtons once had a stronghold. The promontory jutting out into the lake immediately beyond Cladich is known as Inistrynich (Island of the Druids).<br /> <br /> In the past, Loch Awe acted as a natural barrier to protect the Campbells of Inveraray from their enemies to the north. The ruins of Finharn Castle and Kilchurn Castle, as well as many ancient crannogs, can be found there. Loch Awe is also famous for its wild brown trout. <br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.