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TITLE
Loch Awe from the Island of Fraoch looking north
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1103_P004
PLACENAME
Loch Awe
DISTRICT
South Lorn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Glenorchy and Inishail
PERIOD
1830s
CREATOR
John Fleming
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31422
KEYWORDS
lochs
castles
chapels
islands
isles
serpents
snake
snakes
Loch Awe from the Island of Fraoch looking north

Loch Awe lies south east of Oban and, at almost 24 miles (38km) in length, is the longest freshwater loch in Scotland. It is very narrow, being in most places no more than a mile wide. In the past, Loch Awe acted as a natural barrier to protect the Campbells of Inveraray from their enemies to the north. The ruins of Inishail Chapel, Finharn Castle and Kilchurn Castle, as well as many ancient crannogs, can be found there. Loch Awe is also famous for its wild brown trout.

Fraoch Eilean (Heather Island) is a small island at the north end of Loch Awe, about two miles south west of Kilchurn Castle. It consists of two rocky eminences connected by a low beach of sand and shingle. This illustration shows a view from the western eminence looking east towards the ruined castle of the MacNaughtons on the eastern eminence.

According to Celtic poetry, Fraoch Eilean produced the most delicious apples. However, these apples could not be eaten as they were guarded by an enormous serpent.

This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.

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Loch Awe from the Island of Fraoch looking north

ARGYLL: Glenorchy and Inishail

1830s

lochs; castles; chapels; islands; isles; serpents; snake; snakes

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Loch Awe lies south east of Oban and, at almost 24 miles (38km) in length, is the longest freshwater loch in Scotland. It is very narrow, being in most places no more than a mile wide. In the past, Loch Awe acted as a natural barrier to protect the Campbells of Inveraray from their enemies to the north. The ruins of Inishail Chapel, Finharn Castle and Kilchurn Castle, as well as many ancient crannogs, can be found there. Loch Awe is also famous for its wild brown trout. <br /> <br /> Fraoch Eilean (Heather Island) is a small island at the north end of Loch Awe, about two miles south west of Kilchurn Castle. It consists of two rocky eminences connected by a low beach of sand and shingle. This illustration shows a view from the western eminence looking east towards the ruined castle of the MacNaughtons on the eastern eminence. <br /> <br /> According to Celtic poetry, Fraoch Eilean produced the most delicious apples. However, these apples could not be eaten as they were guarded by an enormous serpent.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.