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TITLE
Loch Oich and Invergarry Castle looking west
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1103_P010
PLACENAME
Loch Oich
DISTRICT
Lochaber
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmonivaig
PERIOD
1830s
CREATOR
John Fleming
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31427
KEYWORDS
lochs
rivers
canals
castles
monuments
legends
Loch Oich and Invergarry Castle looking west

Loch Oich is one of three lochs occupying the Great Glen, lying between Loch Lochy and Loch Ness. It is 4 miles (6½ km) long and no more than half a mile (1 km) wide. The River Garry flows into it from the west and the River Oich connects it with Loch Ness to the northeast, as part of the Caledonian Canal. Loch Lochy, Loch Oich and Loch Ness are all linked by this canal built by Thomas Telford (1757-1834). It was partially opened in 1822, but not finally completed until 1847.

Invergarry Castle stands on the shore of the loch, about half a mile east of the settlement of Invergarry. The castle dates from the early 17th century when it was built as a stronghold of the MacDonnell clan. It was burned by General Monck in 1654 but was rebuilt and fortified. It changed hands during the 1715 Jacobite rebellion and was visited by Bonnie Prince Charlie during the 1745 rebellion. In 1746, the castle was destroyed by the Duke of Cumberland's forces and was never rebuilt. Instead, a new mansion house was built nearby which is now the Glengarry Castle Hotel. The ruins of Invergarry Castle are in the grounds of the hotel.

On the western shore of the loch is a monument depicting seven severed human heads. It was erected in 1812 and commemorates an event which may have taken place around 1663. The story goes that two sons of the MacDonnell Chief were murdered during a quarrel with an uncle and his six sons. The murderers' deaths were ordered in vengeance for the crime, and sixty men arrived at the house of the seven, to carry out the execution. Their heads were removed from their bodies and washed in a nearby well, before being presented as a trophy to the Chief in Invergarry. Ever since this event, the well has been known as 'Tobar nan Ceann', 'The Well of the Heads'.

This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.

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Loch Oich and Invergarry Castle looking west

INVERNESS: Kilmonivaig

1830s

lochs; rivers; canals; castles; monuments; legends

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Loch Oich is one of three lochs occupying the Great Glen, lying between Loch Lochy and Loch Ness. It is 4 miles (6½ km) long and no more than half a mile (1 km) wide. The River Garry flows into it from the west and the River Oich connects it with Loch Ness to the northeast, as part of the Caledonian Canal. Loch Lochy, Loch Oich and Loch Ness are all linked by this canal built by Thomas Telford (1757-1834). It was partially opened in 1822, but not finally completed until 1847. <br /> <br /> Invergarry Castle stands on the shore of the loch, about half a mile east of the settlement of Invergarry. The castle dates from the early 17th century when it was built as a stronghold of the MacDonnell clan. It was burned by General Monck in 1654 but was rebuilt and fortified. It changed hands during the 1715 Jacobite rebellion and was visited by Bonnie Prince Charlie during the 1745 rebellion. In 1746, the castle was destroyed by the Duke of Cumberland's forces and was never rebuilt. Instead, a new mansion house was built nearby which is now the Glengarry Castle Hotel. The ruins of Invergarry Castle are in the grounds of the hotel.<br /> <br /> On the western shore of the loch is a monument depicting seven severed human heads. It was erected in 1812 and commemorates an event which may have taken place around 1663. The story goes that two sons of the MacDonnell Chief were murdered during a quarrel with an uncle and his six sons. The murderers' deaths were ordered in vengeance for the crime, and sixty men arrived at the house of the seven, to carry out the execution. Their heads were removed from their bodies and washed in a nearby well, before being presented as a trophy to the Chief in Invergarry. Ever since this event, the well has been known as 'Tobar nan Ceann', 'The Well of the Heads'.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.