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TITLE
Loch Ness from Glenmorriston
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1103_P012
PLACENAME
Loch Ness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
PERIOD
1830s
CREATOR
John Fleming
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31429
KEYWORDS
lochs
canals
rivers
glens
hydro-electric power
mansions
mansion houses
hills
mountains
tourism
tourists
monsters
legends
Loch Ness from Glenmorriston

Loch Ness lies south west of Inverness and is the most northerly and largest of the three lochs in the Great Glen. It is 23 miles (37 km) long, 1 mile (1.6 km) wide and has an average depth of 600 feet (183 metres). This makes it the largest body of fresh water in Great Britain. It forms part of the Caledonian Canal, which runs from Inverness to Fort William, linking Loch Ness, Loch Oich and Loch Lochy.

This view of the loch is taken from a small hill called Creag nan Eun, slightly north east of Invermoriston. The River Moriston flows from Loch Cluanie through Glen Moriston and out into Loch Ness at Invermoriston. Glen Moriston is now the site of the largest power station in the Great Glen hydro-electric scheme.

Just beyond the immediate foreground is a mansion house with its surrounding parks. In the middle distance is Loch Ness, and beyond it the Monadhliath Mountains. Loch Ness is a popular tourist attraction, partly because of its scenery and partly because of Nessie, a monster thought to live in its depths. As far back as the 6th century, St Columba is said to have encountered a mysterious 'water beast' in Loch Ness. A number of sightings in the 20th century generated considerable tourist interest.

This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.

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Loch Ness from Glenmorriston

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1830s

lochs; canals; rivers; glens; hydro-electric power; mansions; mansion houses; hills; mountains; tourism; tourists; monsters; legends

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Loch Ness lies south west of Inverness and is the most northerly and largest of the three lochs in the Great Glen. It is 23 miles (37 km) long, 1 mile (1.6 km) wide and has an average depth of 600 feet (183 metres). This makes it the largest body of fresh water in Great Britain. It forms part of the Caledonian Canal, which runs from Inverness to Fort William, linking Loch Ness, Loch Oich and Loch Lochy. <br /> <br /> This view of the loch is taken from a small hill called Creag nan Eun, slightly north east of Invermoriston. The River Moriston flows from Loch Cluanie through Glen Moriston and out into Loch Ness at Invermoriston. Glen Moriston is now the site of the largest power station in the Great Glen hydro-electric scheme. <br /> <br /> Just beyond the immediate foreground is a mansion house with its surrounding parks. In the middle distance is Loch Ness, and beyond it the Monadhliath Mountains. Loch Ness is a popular tourist attraction, partly because of its scenery and partly because of Nessie, a monster thought to live in its depths. As far back as the 6th century, St Columba is said to have encountered a mysterious 'water beast' in Loch Ness. A number of sightings in the 20th century generated considerable tourist interest.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.